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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Image 17
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 17. February 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2641.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 17. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2641

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 17, February 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2641.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 10, February 1980
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9865
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 17
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f007_002_017.jpg
Transcript .j ,. Page 17 an Allen's, he said you can not be sura without getting the tall fea+hers, which Is wha+ we already knew from +he literature. Van Remson did say that there Is a diagnostic behavioral characteristic when the male begins displaying. He described the Allen's display as follows. The bird starts the display by going back and forth in a low arc about 5 times, making a "Zee...dadada, Zee...dadada" vocalization. Then the bird shoots straight up Into the air and comes down with a "pop" at the end of Its dive. According to Remson, the Rufous Hummingbird does not swing in the low arc before it begins its display. Again Remson says this is a diagnostic behavioral characteristic. Conclusion: It Is my opinion that the Atkins' bird Is not a Rufous Hummingbird. I believe Fred and Ted share this view. Also, the odds of a hybrid being here are probably less than the odds of an Allen's being on the UTC. Thus, I believe we can say that the bird Is a "highly probable" Allen's Hummingbird. However, It can not be determined for sure without tall measurements (preferably the feathers are plucked ...which does not Injure the bird...and saved) or the diagnostic aerial display. If nothing else, Its fun learning more about these two species. —-Jim Morgan COMMENT FROM THE SPOONBILL EDITOR We can learn much from the "search for truth" engendered by the UTC appearance of an occasional puzzler such as the Allen's hummer, it sometimes seems very hard to accept the fact there could be doubt about the Identity of a "text-book" bird, but there are those who feel that as long as there are well-known, long-and-wldely-stud- led problems In establishing the Identity of a particular species, there must remain doubt In their minds. In the Instance of the Allen's hummer, Jim's digging for Information has shown two ways to remove the doubt as pointed out by Van Remson.... net th. bird sn-! m^asur; the tail fea+hers, and/or the aerial display. Hopefully, ano+her attempt to net this bird will be made, and/or the bird will remain long enough to display! (J!m Vardaman, who made such a valiant run for 700 species last year, removed a Siberian Chickadee (a bird he had made a special trip to Edmonton, Canada to see) from his I ls+ when 1+ was la+er netted, studied, and pronounced a leucistlc Black- capped Chickadee. At the time of sighfipg, the Canadian experts who showed him the bird had no doubt It was a Siberian Chickadee, but in-hand study proved otherwise.) Then there are those who feel that "text-book" appearance Is enough, and it Is their privilege if they wish to add a well-seen and well-studied bird to their "list".... life, year's, whatever...for one's list Is one's own. And this _ls_ their privilege. There are no hard-and-fast, a I!-encompassIng "rules" in birding. There are many ways Individuals get their pleasure from birding, and It is the individual's choice as to what makes one comfortable when adding or not adding a species to one's list. The Editor feels that In a case such as the Atkins' Allen's hummer, we must allow the holder of a differing opinion the same privilege of choice we want for ourselves. Anyway, It jLs_ a lot of fun learning more about any of the birds we so enjoy watching, whether we list, don't list, or keep no list at all! AND AN EXPLANATION FROM THE EDITOR It is a well-known fact among her friends that the Editor can't abide a vacancy, in conversation or on a page of THE SPOONBILL. So....last month, confronted by the need to fill a space on the last page, and time fading fast, she dug out a stencil of a drawing by Ben Feltner, and, cognizant of the Larry Balch article In-the December Issue on problems of Identification, decided to have a little fun and possibly give the readers a little exercise. Larry Balch said one of the problems Is "seeing" what you expect to see, or being swayed by a pronouncement. Did my purposefully misleading caption mislead any of you more than momentarily into expecting anything o+rer than a Long-billed Curlew? From the response, i+ gave some of you a moment or +wo of puzzled conjecture as to what. If anything, you might be missing! ANOTHER BIG YEAR RECORD You have heard much about Jim Vardaman's attempt at setting a record of 700 birds in 1979, but we now learn from SIGNAL SMOKE that Alma Barrera set out to surpass Ben Fel+ner's 1973 record of 431 species seen in Texas, and she succeeded, wi+h a total of 452 birds! This included the only Jacana seen (Sept.) at Maner Lake in over a year.