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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Image 14
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 14. February 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2638.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 14. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2638

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 14, February 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2638.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 10, February 1980
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9865
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f007_002_014.jpg
Transcript Page 14 ' bird swam lower in the wa+er and +he head shape was rounder or smoo+her wi+h no bumps. The upper par+s were dark grey—darker than most of +he commons—and extended down below the eye with no whife at alI around or above the eye. The bird rode so low in the water that you couldn't see the white underparts unless it rolled, over. While there was no white dots or stars of any kind It was possible to see paler gray edgings to the feathers on the back at very close range. The bird swam with its head held straight and the neck extended at all times. It seemed to be underwater considerably longer than above water and did not seem to be concerned with us on shore as it moved closer as it dove. —Emery FroeiIch Common Scoter: My wife and I both saw this bird. It was shaped differently from White-winged Scoters seen nearby. It had a smaller bill and held Its head up high. It also had It tail held up. Through our scope the bird was all black on Its head, neck and back. Along the waterllne it was greyish-black. We both looked at the bird for a long time and could see no white or light markings on Its head or anywhere else. We also saw a small protuberance on the base of the upper mandible. We could see no color to the protuberance. When the bird turned towards us, I thought that I could see that the bill was greyish on the sides. I am not sure about this last point. —Steve Calver Ferruginous Hawk: Large, long-winged buteo, tawny on back and shoulder with promlnen" white at base of primaries above; underparts white with rusty leggings, dark smudge at wrist. Seen at 50 ft to 200 yds. In good light. —Will Risser This large hawk was sitting In a small leafless tree beside a shell road in wide open old rice and range fields near Halls Bayou. Put the scope on him and saw rufous wings and very white belly and chest and a lot of white on his head. Just as he was about to fly he stretched out and we saw rufous leggings and as he flew over the road he turned so we saw his undersides. Saw very white wings with dark wrist areas and light seen thru areas under that. White tail. He then turned away from us and we saw the top side of his tail which was half white and the lower half light rusty. Good light for about 5 minutes at about 30 yards. Seen by all four excited observers. —Ruthle Melton Whimbrel: Seen on levee leading to East Beach...clear weather...with wi Mets and grea+er yellowlegs...bi11 shor+, s+out, black, decurved...distinct dark head stripes...pale grey-brown color overall. 7x35, 8x40, 16x50 binocs...seen for five minutes. —P.D. Hulce Black-necked Stilt: 11st da+a. Rather common winter bird In Port Arthur area, despite UTC check- —Mac Read Black-chlnned Hummingbird: Immature male; upper parts green; underparts grayish white: developTrig gorget on throat showed both black and blue-violet below It. Seen with binocs at variable distances of 20 to 60 ft. in fair to good light for 10-30 seconds by alI 3 observers. —J im Morgan ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD: These hummers were reported by Mrs. Don Van Sickle as coming to feeders at her heme in Spring Branch. MA and PJ went there at her request to verify identification. The male was In full adult plumage with brilliant red on the crown and throat (the throat gorget extended all the way back to the nape of the bird...and perhaps reminded an observer of the way a calliope gorget looks, but it was Anna's color of red). He is a large hummer when compared with the SelaiphoHUA sp. also in the area. The back is jewel green. Tall is dark grey or olive grey as are outer primaries of the wings. Chunky body shape. Belly is grey green. He does lots of singing from a peroh In some oleander bushes at a fence near "his" feeder over a cascade in the garden. The "rufous" or females are not allowed by him to come "to that particular feeder. Both females have dark jewel green backs. No red color on crown, but both have a throat patch of rosy red that is "vee" shaped. Bellies of both females are grey green. Tails are dark with a very fine white terminal band (this was not on the male). One female comes to the feeder at a window, while the other comes to a feeder under the porch eaves. None of the Anna's would tolerate the SelaAphonui sp at the feeders, chasing them away as soon as they came into the yard. Both females did some singing while we were there. Mrs. Van Sickle says she has observed them making the pendulum flight pattern since they have been in her yard. They did not engage In this while MA & PJ were there. These observations were made on the 15th of January, sky was overcast, temperature in the 60's, virtually no wind. On Jan. 23rd, Mrs. Van Sickle reported that all were still there, but that she had not observed any more instances of the pendulum flight. On Feb. 4th Mrs. Van Sickle reported that the male had not been . seen since 26th of Jan, but that both females were still there. One of them was flying from the feeder to a dense spot in some shrubbery and doing much singing. She was asked to report any other activity by these birds that she noticed. —T. Paul Jones