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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Image 9
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 9. February 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2633.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 9. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2633

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 9, February 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2633.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 10, February 1980
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9865
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f007_002_009.jpg
Transcript Page 9 Bob responded, shaking the cornmeal ou+ of his beard. We soon learned +o our amazement that these incredibal optimists had flown Into Tulsa from New York just to see the birds, and had to leave at noon the next day! We decided to consult the Refuge manager about our prospects for the next day. Locating him at home by telephone, we learned that he had sometimes seen the birds during their dawn flight across a certain stretch of lake shore. He also suggested an area of the lake shore where they might be observed bathing around 10 a.m. Then, if our best efforts failed, he said that he would come out on Saturday afternoon and take us back In+o fhe closed area where we had failed to see the B.G.'s on our one try there on Friday. -.,.-. - i?ai-A Dawn found us on the lake shore, squinting through the murky light, haze, and cold wind at thousands of geese flying over us toward the closed Pennington Unit. We then shifted our attention to one of the open feeding areas where we had spent a great deal of time on Friday. My rapidly disintegrating tripod added to our frus trations. The folks from New York looked cheerful but concerned. Suddenly a pickup appeared, bearing Refuge manager Jim Harmon, half a day early! Because of the worsening weather, he had postponed a hunting trip to take us into the Pennington Unit before It started raining. Richard, Bob, and 1 jumped into his vehicle and we headed for Pennington. We thanked him profusely all the way for his southwestern hospitality and incredible courtesy to us birders, and he was obviously pleased that we were enjoying his Refuge. We eased slowly into Pennington and toward the feeding areas — acres of geese which would disappear for the day at an untimely sneeze or the lowering of a creaky car window. Jim set up his window-mount telescope while the rest of us jockeyed into viewing positions with our binoculars. Within a couple of minutes. Bob had spotted one Barnacle Goose. With his direction, Richard and I got quick looks at the white face and black eyellne that had been eluding us. After another 20 minutes, they reappeared, and Jim got them In his scope. We all exercised our gymnastics abilities and twisted around Jim to get great looks at the black chest and banded gray backs of an adult and one Immature Barnacle Goose. What a reward for our struggle! By now one carload of birders had arrived from the other part of the Refuge and wer watting for us outside the Pennington Unit gate. I took their car and went back for the New York folks, while Jim took them In for a look. Finally, after much cautious belly crawling, everyone made It into the front seat for a look through the scope. After a late victory breakfast, we delivered Richard back to the airport. We were very glad that he had called Alice the night before and extended his airplane ren+al for another day. AM nine of us who were treated to a fabulous lifer were grateful to Jim Harman for giving up his Saturday morning to give us his Invaluable assistance. On the way home I realized that I,had left my beloved down coveralls In his car, and within days they arrived in the mall, unsolicited! Chasing wild and rare birds can often be frustrating and unproductive, but when the attempt ends like this one. It makes all the others worthwhile! PUCES TO GO With wintering birds still with us, the familiar routes we've taken for the past several months are still good, W. Harris County (another Green-tailed Towhee was found out there Feb. 3, which makes four seen In the past two months. This one was on Longenbaugh Road, about fifty yards west of Katy-Hockley Road....hedgrows on both sides of the road) has been and still Is the place +o go. Numerous Grasshopper sparrows were seen on Sharpe road this past weekend, across the road from +he glider hanger. Recently we asked for reports on Sheldon Reservoir, and Bill and Jean Harwell went out there reconnoIterIng, and had this to say: "Some things are out there, the water is up, and maybe they're coming back. But the condition of the place just makes you sick...Its so run-down and beat-up, and looks like NO one is there to supervise it or care for it. That was such a great place in years past! Unfortunately, there is much building activity around the periphery...housing, sports fields, Industrial buildings, etc." Check the CH for Sheldon sightings by them and others. In just a few weeks it will be time to start checking migrant traps for early spring migrants....salt cedars along beaches, High Is., Freeport Mun. Park, Galveston Is. St. Park, are just a few to consider.