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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Image 8
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 8. February 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2632.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 8. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2632

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 8, February 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2632.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 10, February 1980
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9865
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f007_002_008.jpg
Transcript Page 8 few people were aware of social behavior in birds. So...."This lack of public knowledge, my experience with the Mallards, and my discovery of the research all led me to the writing of this field guide. It is the result of my desire to share with others the endless surprise and discovery produced by behavior-watching. In the second chapter, Mr. Stokes explains the information you need to interpret a bird's behavior: "The general timing of the bird's life s+ages, knowledge of l+s displays used to communicate with other birds, and the details of Its major behavior patterns." To answer these needs, the Information on each bird In this buide Is organized Into three sections: a behavior calendar, a display guide, and behavior descriptions. Most of the birds dealt with in this book are species seen dally in the yard, or frequently in the field, and thus are easily accessible for behavior watching. The guide is designed to help you Interpret what you see In the field. We predict that with the aid of this book, you too will discover new surprises and treasure hunts. Bird Behavior....A Question "Why does the Mockingbird raise Its wings?" That was a question put to Anne Elston by one of the third-graders at her recent slide show In a Katy school. She discovered from the Stokes book that this behavior is called Wing-flashing, indulged In by both male and female Mockingbirds, and...."Is not known whether It has a communicative function". Drat! So....we went on to Bent: "It is thought by some that these performances are indulged In to start Ie unseen Insects Into betraying their whereabouts, but this needs more definite study and proof than are now available". Well, that doesn't seem to pin anything down. How about Oberholser?.."When foraging on the ground the Mockingbird frequently lifts its wings In a "wlng-flashing" gesture the significance of which Is controversial, but which perhaps has the effect of flushing grasshoppers out of the turf". Humn-n-n, now wouldn't you think that a bird so visible as a Mockingbird would have tons of pages of research written about every little movement with definite answers? If any reader knows of some research and writing on this little habit of our familiar "Mock-bird" (so named by Mark Cates- by In the early I700's) please let us hear from you. NOT JUST ANOTHER WILD GOOSE CHASE. by Mary Ann Chapman 1+ having been a year since the famous "Wild Bahama Duck Chase" +ha+ I made +o Laguna A+ascosa (see THE SPOONBILL, Dec, 1978) wi+h Ben Fel+ner, and having recovered from Chris+mas Count season and two weeks in Mexico, I decided to make a run for the Barnacle Geese reported at the Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge on Lake Texoma In January. Checking with Refuge manager Jim Harman, I learned that the geese were frequentng an area of +he Refuge to which access was available only on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, that It was a matter of picking five Barnacles out of 30,000 Canadas, and that since the Canadas were s+ar+lng +o move northward, our chances were less than 50-50. But since my California visitor Bob Behrstock was chafing a+ the bl+, Richard Albert had already arranged to rent a plane In Alice to fly up and meet us, and I had an excuse to concoct a business appointment in Dallas on Thursday afternoon, we decided to go for It. Thus near midnight on January 17, after solving a maze of unmarked country roads. Bob and I rolled into the tiny Tishomingo airport at the dead end of a dirt road adjacent to the Refuge. We quickly located Richard, already snug In his sleeping bag under the wing of his Beechcraft. Barred and Great Horned Owls called over the nocturnal chattering of the geese. The next morning, fortified with a mammoth breakfast from Petty's Restaurant (recommended - $1.95), we arrived at Refuge headquarters to find a contingent of TOS members from Wichita Falls and Fort Worth waiting for us. Upon the recommendation of Refuge personnel, we spent the day examining thousands of Canada Geese along the lake shore and in several feeding areas. We received a thorough self-education on five subspecies of Canada Geese of all sizes and several plumages of Blue Geese, with a sprinkling of Snows, Whlte-fronteds and Ross' for varie+y. The day s special treats were several adult Bald Eagles and a Prairie Falcon, but no Barnacle Geese. Hungry and decidedly grubby from our day In the field, we attacked dinner at the Western Inn Motel (all the catfish you can eat for $2.95, every Friday night). As we debated whether to give it another day's try, we were suddenly accosted by a trio of fresh, dapper birders attracted by Richard's bird-patch-bedecked jacket. "We bet he knows where the Barnacle Geese are!" they exclaimed. "Oh no, he doesn't!"