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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Image 7
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 7. February 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2631.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 7. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2631

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 7, February 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2631.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 10, February 1980
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9865
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f007_002_007.jpg
Transcript , Page 7 One must have permission from the Warden at the Weeting Reserve, who Is not there every day, and a permit must be purchased. We made our way back to the hide, after the formalities of getting in through the warden. The Stone Curlew must have a particular breeding habitat, one that Is a barren sandy wasteland with close-cropped turf. In this area I believe this Is accomplished by the encouragement of the European hare that spend all their waking hours cropping turf. We were barely settled In the hide when a couple of these strange, thick-kneed ungainly birds came into view. They have huge goggley yellow eyes and a round-headed appearance. They would come up and go back over the rise like little ghosts but soon they came closer and began to display right in front of the hide, as if on queue. We were told this was most unusual and we were most fortunate to be witnessing this sight. They would run furtively with head low and body hunched toward each other and then back off slowly as if they had changed their minds about the whole thing after all. They usually emerge at night to feed and forage. If surprised in the open they will slink quietly away to lie, with outstretched neck, behind some little bush or mound, achieving a miraculous camouflage. We seemed never to tire of watching the antics of these strange creatures and left reluctantly, birding our way slowly back to the warden's caravan and there saw another strange sight. While we were speaking to the Warden, an immature Tawny Owl suddenly and silently dropped down near the caravan and proceeded to stare at us as Intently as we did at him. It was a beautiful bird and almost entirely wild, altho It had been raised by the Warden after being found in the woods, either fallen or taken from the nesf. It came back for food occasionally but now It flew off as silently as It came....a beautiful creature. Near here the Laburnum was blooming alt about and hung in luscious golden droopy clusters. Hera we saw one of the few remaining pairs of Red-backed Shrikes breeding in Britain. At another place not far distant we found the Wood Lark. Several places of historical interest were visited briefly and we arrived in Cley after dark. This was probably our favorite trip. But the place of never-ending excitement and wonder was the Cley marshes. Across the road from the marshes is Walsey HIM, a small preserve of hillside gorse, or broom, thickets and paths leading down the HIM Into another marsh and willows. Hera can be found the Willow, Reed and Sedge Warblers. A pair of Bullfinches were found also. Walsey Hill was a delightful place to sit and survey the surrounding countryside the marshes and coastline on one side and Cley In the distance with Its quaint Dutch windmill, the ancient cathedral and its flintstone cottages wi+h red pan-tile roofs. But all of this would soon come to an end. Two members of our group left for London on the sixth day. The rest of us were soon to embark on the last of the extensions with Bryan...to North and South Wales and southern England ending at New Forest but this will be another sequel to this birding Journey to be written another day. BIRD BEHAVIOR A Book Review? "A Guide to the Behavior of Common Birds" More and more of our readers are voicing interest in this or that ins+ance of a bird's behavior, so the Editor requested help from Linda Walsh of The Chickadee In providing some source material. With apparent sleight-of-hand, she Immediately produced a new (1979) book by Donald W. Stokes, "A Guide to the Behavior of Common Birds, with original Illustrations by J. F. Lansdowne. Dealing with common birds, some of which we see dally, It Is an excellent introduction to the fun of Behavior Watching. As the author explains in the opening chapter, "I have always enjoyed the continual treasure hunt of bird-watching....going out in the early morning and searching grasses, shrubs and trees for the least movement, quickly spotting the familiar birds, and puzzling over new spring arrivals or fall migrants. But at the same time. Just making lists of birds I'd seen left me feeling somewhat unsatisfied...! sensed I wasn't getting to the heart of the matter, was somehow passing up an opportunity or neglecting a resource. What could I do with a bird once I knew its name?" An article on Mallards with Illustrations of the birds in strange poses, with labeled captions, led him to a duck pond to see for himself if he had really been missing something all the years of his bird-watching. He found the birds doing the very things Illustrated in the article, and to his excitement, found the Mallard had become a new bird to him. "The surprise and treasure hunt had been restored to my birding". This experience led him to explore ornithological journals, in search of articles on behavior of common birds, and discovered many. But he also discovered that very