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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Image 4
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 4. February 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2628.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2628

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 4, February 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2628.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 10, February 1980
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9865
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f007_002_004.jpg
Transcript Page 4 VIVA EL NARANJO! by Jim Morgan On December 27, 1979, David Matson, Walter Piper and I departed Houston at 5:00 a.m. with the destination of Ciudad Mante In southern Tamaullpas, Mexico. About 14 hours later, Including a lunch break and almost 2 hours getting through red tape at the border, we arrived at our motel In Mante where we met fellow 00 members Ron and Marcia Braun. After dinner It was off to bed so we could get an early start birding the next day. In the early morning darkness, we CG'ers headed out to the El Naranjo Christmas Count circle, which was to occupy our entire birding activities for the next four days. The EI Naranjo circle Is mainly located In the Mexican state of San Luis Po+osi and we chose to begin birding on the far western edge of the circle and work our way back to the east. As this was the first day of Mexican birding for all our group but David Matson, lifers were coming "fast and furious" through the day. Spending most of the day in the higher forest after a couple of hours on the drier western slope, the four of us new to Mexico picked up about 25-30 lifers each. Some of the more Interesting birds of the day which we alI saw were Muscovy Duck, Bat Falcon, Military Macaw, Squirrel Cuckoo, Blue-crowned Motmo+, Barred An+shrlke, Brown-backed Soll+aire, Rufous-browed Peppershrlke, 5 "Mexican" warblers, 2 species of Euphonla, and Blue BuntIng. Heading back +o Man+e af+er our first day of birding none of us were aware that we were yet to see our best bird of the day. This circumstance was brought about by the fact that a truck/car accident on the return road to Mante completely blocked all traffic and we were left with the choices of trying to wait until the road was cleared, take an alternate route of 180 miles, or go back +o the count circle to find a place to stay the night. We opted for the latter, and after locating a spot for the night we decided to go out Into the darkness and do some owllng. We had not gone a half mile when our light located two orange eyes on top of a pole along the side of the road. These eyes belonged to one of the strangest but most fascinating birds I have ever seen....a Common Potoo! All 5 of us watched this bird for at least 20 minutes while Ron took several pictures, guessing at exposures needed for the odd light situatton we had. This bird more than made up for the Inconvenience of our blocked return path to Mante. We spent our second day birding along the river and in the lowlands of theicount circle. The most memorable moment of this second day came for me as we rounded a bend in a dirt road and spotted a raptor in a bare-limbed tree across a sugar cane field but in our direct view. This bird was buffy white with a black mask and distinctly barred tail. After only a few seconds of viewing, the bird took flight and correct shouts of the identification were heard....Laughing Falcon! What a gorgeous raptor! It alighted once again to allow careful viewing with our scopes. Shortly after this sighting we were to view a Great Black Hawk just down the road. Other good birds this second day included Collared Forest-Fa Icon, Ruddy Ground-dove, Green Parakeet and Red-crowned Parrots In full view while perched, and White-collared Swift. .vr'vi +r»„. At the end of our second day of birding we met El Naranjo Count co-compilers and fellow 00 members, Ben Feltner and Mary Ann Chapman, along with several other birders, back in Mante to swap birding stories of our two delightful days of birding and their exuberant experiences at Tezultlan. We also made plans to go out together the next day within the count circle once again. Some of our third day was spent scouting the count circle for marshes, but many good birds were also seen. These Included Short-tailed Hawk, Immature Peregrine Falcon (always good to see). Fork-tailed Emerald, and Masked Tityra. During the day we also met up with former UTC birder Holly Hobart, who was down to help out on the Count. Our fourth and final day of birding was Count Day for the El Naranjo Count. Even after 3 days of birding entirely within the count circle I still picked up ten lifers on Count day, including a Rufescent Tlnamou which crossed right in front of our car on a dirt road. Mottled Owl, Yellow-billed Cacique, Dusky-tailed Ant-tanager, Black-headed Sal+a+or and Crimson-collared Grosbeak. How well did the count turn out? Would you believe 245 species with only 14 observers? That's right! And It was done on a day when the higher forest had fog and/or low clouds all day! With 30 or more good observers, and good weather, Ben feels this count can approach 275 species! And this is an Inland count, far from sal+wa+er. What po+en+ial! In four days of birding our par+y of 3 saw 214 species wl+hln the El Naranjo count circle, and we could only cover maybe 15)8 of the circle which fs 90? blrdable habi-