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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Image 3
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 3. February 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2627.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2627

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980 - Image 3, February 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2645/show/2627.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 28, No. 10, February 1980
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXVIII, No. 10, February 1980
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9865
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f007_002_003.jpg
Transcript Page 3 A NOTE FROM DEE ROSS (Dee and S+even Ross were the first resident caretakers-curators at Audubon House, ELMNS, and have been living in Chagrin Falls, Ohio for several years.) At the end of August I drove (4,000 miles) to Alaska with my parents, then flew back. I saw so many new things and ecosystems, for this was my first close look at the Great Plains and Rockies. New animals to me were American Bison, moose, barren ground caribou, marmot, dall sheep, arctic ground squirrels, grizzley bear. Birding was difficult because my dad was driving and didn't stop often. But I managed a Yellow-headed BJackbird (at 60 mph) in North Dakota! Other lifers were golden eagle, goshawk, boreal chickadee, willow and rock ptarmingan, northern shrike and sage grouse. I stayed In the Interior between Fairbanks and Anchorage, which is a good birding area earlier In the summer. Being with non-blrders hampered me—but what can you do! ~"* Also visited Mt. McKlnley...magnificent view of the mountain with no clouds around the peak (lucky Dee...Ed.). Picked wild blueberries, had a flying trip above my dad's hunting area, fished and caught grayling (yummy), saw beginning of sockeye salmon spawning....altogether it was great and I'd love to go back for more hiking, birding, etc. Tell our friends hello for us, we hope to see them when we come for a visit in May. NOTES ON A "FUNNY" LAUGHING GULL by Malcolm Hodges Polly Moore, Ellen Red and I made a trip to the Texas City Dike on the 20th of Jan., looking for Red-throated Loons, Sprague's Pipit, and anything else of Interest that might happen, upon us. Although all the loons were rather common, we were well- pleased with a sedate Sprague's Pipit, which was a lifer for the three of us. However, we are in agreement that the best bird of the day was of a species more abundant even than the loons....a Laughing Gull. The bird readily distinguished himself from the riff-raff of winter laughers. We saw him around II a.m. at the end of the Dike, flying with many of his species, and . kept our eyes on him constantly, fearing that he might fly away. His field marks were as follows: big, red bill, the color of a Caspian Tern's and the size of the surrounding gulls; completely black head, as in a summer adult, with a broken white eye-ring; dusky brown-and-black wings, as in Ist-year laughers; slate-gray back; white underparts, neck, and rump (mantle flecked with grey); white tail with a broad black terminal band extending to the tip; black legs and feet. The bird was identi cal In size and behavior to the Laughing Gulls nearby. When, after 15 minutes, it appeared the bird was going to hang around, we decided tc try a ploy to get a very close look.at him. Ellen pulled out a Granola bar and fed the greater part of !t to this gull and hts compadres. As a result, we were able tc see the bird from as close as 6'. In the process, we studied the many other Laughing Gulls as well, no+lng that most of his characferls+ics were observed in the transitional plumages of others, except two we couldn't explain....the very red bill (no color variation from base to tip), and the summer-black head. Many others had begun to get their black'heads, but none were more than'halfway there, while our bird's head had not a white feather on it (except the eye-ring). At this point, the three of us were still unsure about the bird's I.D. We were sure, though, that we had studied him sufficiently, so that we might, after some research, come to a decision. After looking through some references and consulting other birders, I feel sure the bird is a Laughing Gull, based on size, plumage, and behavior. Bill color is known to be variable In gulls, and I can only hope that his offspring have bills of similar hue—it was quite handsome! As for the black head, It can be postulated that his "biological clock" has for some reason suffered an imbalance, causing his head to come Into spring plumage early. Bent, in Life Histories of North American Gulls and Terns, says he can find no evidence that laughers acquire black heads between 1st and 2nd year plumages. Birders working the coast should be on the lookout for odd gulls of this sort. He has certainly caused me to look twice at a species I usually pass over with a glance! CAbout a year ago a bird, very similar In appearance to the one described above, wa« seen In the Bolivar Ferry area by several Louisiana birders,'Who raised the questlor of It possibly being a gull from fhe Mediterranean area. However, study of slides^ taken of the bird produced a consensus of opinion that it was a "different" looking Laughing Gull Ed.3