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The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 6, October 1968
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 6, October 1968 - Image 4. October 1968. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 7, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2464/show/2459.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1968). The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 6, October 1968 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2464/show/2459

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 6, October 1968 - Image 4, October 1968, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 7, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2464/show/2459.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 6, October 1968
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVII, No. 6, October 1968
Contributor (Local)
  • Bradley, Ewell C.
  • Bradley, Julia
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1968
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9853
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f001_010_004.jpg
Transcript Page 4. THE CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT In the December 17, I967 issue of the New York Times, Roger Tory Peterson says: "Birds, with their high rate of metabolism and furious pace of living, reflect life forces more sensitively than any other animal. Like the canaries once used by miners to detect gas leakage, they give us early warning of changes in environment. And it is to the rank and file of amateurs—through such activities as the Christmas bird count—that we owe much of what is known about the sweep and movement of migration, of invasion, distribution and extension of range." - - - - The OG Group has scheduled its Christmas Count for December 21st. Thus far we have no leader. We need a leader and we need preliminary organization to make this successful. We realize that this is a difficult and time-consuming task, but we also hope that there is some one dedicated enough to oome forth and volunteer his or her services!! WARBLING by Sarah Gordon and Melba Drake As early as September 14th we visited one of our favorite haunts at time of warbler migration - Galveston County Park at League City. A mild cool front with heavy rains and winds had occurred a few days before. Following the many sociable Chickadees and Titmice around the park we found 13 species of warblers. Although there were not great numbers of individuals, we were unable to determine total numbers of each species with any accuracy. The Canada, Chestnut-sided and Black-and-White Warblers were the most numerous, but brilliantly prominent were the several Blue-winged and Golden-winged Warblers. Single individuals of the Yellowthroat, Kentucky and Hooded Warblers were seen in the low brush on the southwest side of the park. In this same area was our Number One of the day - two Ovenbirds. For mysterious reasons, Ovenbirds had eluded us for years. Dare we hope for a Woodeock? The Yellow-throated, Black-throated Green, Yellow and Redstarts (male and female) completed our Warbler Sightings. On Sunday, September 15th, after a morning storm, we joined the Davises and Tvetens at the park. The Blue-winged, Golden-winged and Chestnut-sided were again seen although the park was considerably quieter. The Blackburnian, Parula and Redeyed Vireo were added to the list of early migrants. P. S. On October 6th, right on schedule, we heard and saw our first geese flights of Snows and Blues. What a glorious sight and sound! WHAT IS HAPPENIHG TO OUR VISITORS THE GANNETS?? Mrs. Bessie G. Cornelius of Beaumont has been keeping us informed as to some of the sightings of these birds by herself and others. She states that on July 4, I968 Mrs. Jane Owens of Beaumont saw an immature Gannett standing on the beaoh on Bolivar Peninsula, to be more specific, at Crystal Beach between Gilchrist and the town of Bolivar. Some small boys were amusing themselves by throwing beer cans at it! Mrs. Owens is under the impression that the bird was sick. In a letter to the editors dated Oetober 5, I968 Bessie Cornelius states the following: "After reading the account of Gannets over Bolivar I told Sharon Davis I would look up my notes and send you the correct information. They were observed by four of us, Sharon Davis, Jo Sims, Omera Van Zandt and I. Jo and Omera are old, credible birders. So, with a few additions such as the reference to Audubon Magazine's "Strange Powerful Birds" here is my report: "GANNETS! 'STRANGE POWERFUL BIRDS, SIR'. Strange and powerful, that was our reaction to the Gannets observed on August 26, at about 11:30 A. M., Bolivar Peninsula, Sun Oil property, flying fairly low toward the Bay area. There were five in the first group but they quickly separated into a group of three which we observed the best. The second and third sightings in the same vicinity and shortly thereafter were much higher. The third time, however, we were able to clearly see the dark wing tips when they banked in the sun. The first sight of these large white birds brought us tumbling out of the car before it was barely stopped and Sharon shouting, 'Pelagic birds.' Our attention was focused first on the unusually long, slender pointed wings, secondly on the pronounced