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The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 6, October 1968
Image 3
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 6, October 1968 - Image 3. October 1968. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 7, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2464/show/2458.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1968). The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 6, October 1968 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2464/show/2458

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 6, October 1968 - Image 3, October 1968, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 7, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2464/show/2458.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 6, October 1968
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVII, No. 6, October 1968
Contributor (Local)
  • Bradley, Ewell C.
  • Bradley, Julia
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1968
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9853
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f001_010_003.jpg
Transcript Page 3. Noel Pettingell has sent to the Editors a copy of the information on the new 6-cent WATERFOWL CONSERVATION Commemorative Postage Stamp: "The 6-cent Waterfowl Conservation stamp, the first in the annual series that will point to the need for protecting wildlife, will be first placed on sale at Cleveland, Ohio, on October 24, 1968. "This stamp depicting wood ducks recognizes the accomplishments of Ducks Unlimited, an organization that has spent nearly $15 million for waterfowl conservation. Scattered across the prairies are some 900 Ducks Unlimited projects involving roughly a million and a half acres. These are heavily populated with waterfowl. "California artist Stanley W. Galli designed the horizontal stamp which will be printed on ivory paper in blue, green, yellow, red and black. It will be issued in panes of 50, with an initial printing of 120 million." According to the Houston Post Office, this stamp will be on sale in Houston on October 25th or shortly thereafter. DUCKS UNLIMITED is an international sportsmen's organization. As Bob Brister points out in his column in the Houston Chronicle, dated July 16, 1968, "In years such as this one, the contributions made by DUCKS UNLIMITED in the building of reservoirs and re- flooding of natural habit become really Important. For instance, right now Southern Alberta is almost dry except for DUCKS UNLIMITED projects there (which have been financed almost entirely by donations by American sportsmen). And perhaps even more important is that DUCKS UNLIMITED has proved it CAN be done, if the money is spent. Unfortunately, in the vast Canadian areas where normally some two million potholes are available for the birds, DUCKS UHLIMITED nor the Canadian government has been able to save enough nesting areas to make up for the loss to agriculture." Speaking of the Canadian breeding grounds, "Hormally there are some two million water areas available to the nesting duoks in the areas of good production. This year there are only about 600,000 such areas available, and many of them were passed up by the ducks when they arrived on the breeding grounds this spring. (What happened in some areas was that there was little or no water when the birds arrived ... then it rained afterwards, providing the needed potholes, but too late for those birds which went on north). The big danger, many biologists believe, is that a large percentage of the duoks whieh tried to nest farther north than their normal range will not be able to have their broods on the wing before early freezes set in. The timing is very critical, not only here, but on the prairies to the south where hatches are now appearing ... but more rains are now needed to bring them to maturity. Dueks just must have water, and man has gradually reduced their normal breeding areas through drainage for croplands." As Mr. Brister states in another column appearing in the Houston Chronicle, dated October 8, 1968, "Wild geese will fill moonlit skies with their song of autumn tonight, high above local clouds, arriving on high-altitude air currents and navigating by the moon and stars on an ancestral schedule whieh has varied little in the past 200 years. How the clamoring snows and blues, flying in family groups along with thousands of others, each year can schedule their departure to take advantage of the full moon, air currents and arrive on the Texas Coast almost invariably within seven days of Oct.15. one way or another, is a feat of weather 'forecasting' and celestial navigation not fully understood by man. "Unfortunately, this year's crop of waterfowl brings along a set of problems not fully understood by all men. They will be protected (or some say, hurt!) by some of the most restrictive hunting regulations in years. And the controversy over whether these regulations are good or bad has gone far beyond the 'griping' of the hunters." Mr. Brister spent some time in South Louisiana last weekend where he spent several hours talking with some of the most prominent hunters - landowners - sportsmen as well as conservationists in that part of the country. The controvery rages between the Department of the Interior and the Louisiana hunters. Space does not permit quoting all of Mr. Brister's columns on this subject. They do present two sides of the coin. Undoubtedly many of our Houston readers have read these columns and we are re-printing some of the things he says mostly for the benefit of our out of town readers. We who "hunt" with telescopes and binoculars instead of guns, if we are realistic, admit that hunting, if properly controlled does help to maintain that delicate balance in Nature 'we so much wish to maintain. We hope that the hunters and those who make the restrictive laws will always work together toward that end.