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The Spoonbill, March 2001
Image 4
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The Spoonbill, March 2001 - Image 4. March 2001. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/244/show/239.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 2001). The Spoonbill, March 2001 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/244/show/239

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, March 2001 - Image 4, March 2001, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/244/show/239.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, March 2001
Contributor (Local)
  • Haddican, Mary Pat
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date March 2001
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 13, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9886
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b013_f005_003_004.jpg
Transcript Field Tips Thrush Identification: Brown and "Speckled' Don Richardson Brown thrushes with speckled breasts are in our Upper Texas Coast (UTC) areas at any time ofthe year. They are not all here all the time. The Hermit Thrush resides here in winter, and the Wood Thrush arrives here to breed. Migrants include the Veery, Swainson's Thrush and Gray- cheeked Thrush. At certain times in migration they can all be found, though less so in fall The key words in this ID Tips article are warm and cool. Looking for brown colors in these birds which are warm or cool provides a great tool for separating the species. First, look at the color ofthe back (head to toe) and look, specifically, for a difference in the color ofthe head/nape and the tail. If you find a difference, you have one ofthe easiest two, a Wood Thrush or a Hermit Thrush. The Wood Thrush has a warm, reddish-brown head/nape and a cool brown tail, while the Hermit Thrush has a warm, reddish-brown tail and a cool brown head/nape. It is this contrasting difference between the head and tail that tells the story. One other noteworthy thing about the Wood Thrush is that the spots on the breast are bigger and bolder than on the other thrushes discussed here. Veeries are usually fairly warm brown on the back. The western and eastern races of Veery pass through the UTC in migration. The eastern race is warmer than the western race, but both are a warm tone. The key word for the Veery is "plain." The breast is just faintly spotted. The other thrushes are much more distinctly spotted. The face is plain, too, and, if there is an eye-ring, it is not very prominent and it is gray. Migrating thrushes that seem to give the most trouble are Swainson's and the Gray-cheeked. Both have cool brown backs. I like to look for a warm or cool face. Both can have eye-rings of sorts, but in Gray-cheeked, any eye-ring is either broken and gray-white or nonexistent. Swainson's has an eye-ring that is bright and buffy (warm). The lores (in front ofthe eye) are also warm and buffy, resembling a pair of warm buffy spectacles. The Gray-cheeked Thrush, on the other hand, has a face of cool gray— no warmth at all. Check those thrushes, they're cool (or warm). Contact Don at (281) 997-0485 or cdplace@concentric.net with questions or comments. Bald Eagle Nest on the Web M. P. Haddican Although we would always opt for an outdoor birding experience over sitting in front of a computer screen, the growing use of nature webcams presents some incomparable opportunities for studying birds. At www.nu.com/eagles. a solar-powered camera is positioned to view an eagle nest on an island in the Connecticut River in Massachusetts. A pair of bald eagles has recently returned to the nest and, unfazed by the recent snowstorm, are caring for three eggs. The picture is updated every five minutes, giving viewers an opportunity to see every aspect ofthe process of rearing and fledging the (hoped for) baby eagles . As discussed in the commentary, eagle nesting attempts are not always successful. But in 2000, the website broadcast the progress of two eaglets hatching, receiving feedings from the adults, testing their wings and leaving the nest. Stay tuned.