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The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 8, August 1989
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 8, August 1989 - Image 4. August 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2425/show/2422.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1989). The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 8, August 1989 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2425/show/2422

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 8, August 1989 - Image 4, August 1989, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2425/show/2422.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 38, No. 8, August 1989
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXVIII, No. 8, August 1989
Contributor (Local)
  • Price, Libby
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date August 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 5
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9874
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f005_007_004.jpg
Transcript id rji qj a c a a o o A tj W , o v o r> s a <, C • 4J JJ TJ once ti fi TJ 4> 41 > j_i W .-I u u Ortrt RJ 3 3 .a a> ti u 0) U TJ 41 ■JJ X (0 TJ ecu .C 0) C - O W C pj C l-> Vrt £f* jj x: C B fl TJ 10 4) 4) B -C tf-r-l M *> Gt-t O -* -^ 3 C > J3 n o <h i e « c a a «* o O-h 41 J C S-P m -p o ace J*. 9 U O TJ 3 O rH n * u _ tjt 9 00 3 : __! -u *o 3 M 0) -M 0) TJ <*> ft) •* > "-_ ! > >_. ***_«> "h O w 2: A u LO UJ h- o z UJ LO o z z c_ < UJ _, _ tn _ _ _ C fl ."> c 1) •* aj O JZ Q. v tn 4J > -< _-ic u fl .J m - _ u o c o s m • 9 O TJ u 4 in id " ti ? <:*•§*« Er^r-i 3 o o c ■ A C O V iJ <0 A 41 U Mil UJ3 . in .-c in o io i> co <n moo t 1HI_ r-rtHNOIfflCS(MH ^N.V.N.N.'S.'S.N.'S.WS. f<Sr-o>HwHinVHNCTl HCOHN' i m i f* -t c o tj ■o a J fl ib oj: • M 41 a) w U 4-i jj a i anin ot x i i a e w .c 3 v M 4-» O M O O s_( *v nun s n x TJ U Q TJ O n o 4) 4-» 4J c fl 3 a n c c i c u i 3 -t E n q c c **£ A O ) u gi in ti ■ > > N W ) fl fl D rH ) J J W ■o i io « m *a • > > ra ) 41 41 A • ccua 4) 4) —J • •a o at x II II II H C V 4) ra 4J m a to 3 JtHrt C U>rt A rprt O 41 ft *-> a, m .o.!ao» > n u ac NORTHWEST LAKE SUPERIOR - MARCH BIRDS by David Marrack The primitive silence of the black spruce and birch secondary growth forest was broken by distant whispering twitters that sounded a bit like Pine Siskins. We walked around the bend in the trail, crunching foot-deep snow. Ahead, at some undefined point Lake Superior began below 30 to 40 inches of ice and a coat of snow. Out a half a mile and more on the open windswept ice were 75 to 100 hardy souls with vans and snowmobiles huddled about fishing holes. They were the annual Silver Bay Fishing Contest. I learned later that nobody caught a fish! My niece and I cut down a side trail towards a collection of summer bayhouses. In a clearing within a dense stand of spruce were the twitterers: nine Common Redpolls so tame they were around our feet and only an arm's length away on a shoulder high bank. It was as good an introduction to a life bird as you could want. This was the third species in some 90 minutes of birding! Earlier, on our way up the west side of Lake Superior to the Sibley Peninsula we had seen numerous crows and ravens. Further on, in front of a cottage at nearly empty feeders were numerous Black-capped Chickadees, Red-breasted Nuthatches and more redpolls all darting back and forth. We could find no Hoary Redpolls there nor at some feeders further down the road which were crowded with about six Evening Grosbeaks and 50 Common Redpolls. Late in the afternoon at a paper mill discharge pond in Port Arthur we found seven Herring Gulls, the first reported sighting of this first of the spring migrants to return to the area. A Velvet Scoter and two Common Goldeneyes shared the water. Out on the jumbled bay ice, on top of a big block, stood an immature tan-colored Snowy Owl occasionally turning its head to keep an eye on a coyote wandering far out on the inhospitable ice. At Toronto Airport the previous day I spotted three Red-tailed Hawks and a Northern Harrier. I was told the Snowy Owls had already left. The one at Port Arthur left a few days after my visit. Before 7:00 a.m. Sunday, with the generous guidance of Nick Escot, whom many of us knew in Houston when he lived here several years back, we drove west and tried unsuccessfully to locate Great Gray Owls and a Gyrfalcon that had been around through the winter up to 10 days earlier. Although this was mid-March it was considered late in the season to see "real northerners"! Many of the isolated farms maintain bird feeders and we did a tour of these, finding Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers, Pine and Evening Grosbeaks in small flocks, always very busy and noisy. Blue Jays and a few Gray Jays and crows were also seen. The only ravens were flying overhead, but at a local trash dump they were numerous, and were presided over by a Bald Eagle, the tamest I've ever met. He just watched us in the car less than 50 feet away and went on feeding. At the port's turning basin, which was the only open-water area, a raft of goldeneye were feeding. Nearby there is a resident colony of Merlins based on the port buildings. I watched one that felt it was mealtime and suddenly took off from the ledge and flew down on pigeons and sparrows feeding