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The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 7, November 1968
Image 8
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 7, November 1968 - Image 8. November 1968. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2367/show/2362.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1968). The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 7, November 1968 - Image 8. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2367/show/2362

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 7, November 1968 - Image 8, November 1968, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2367/show/2362.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 7, November 1968
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVII, No. 7, November 1968
Contributor (Local)
  • Bradley, Ewell C.
  • Bradley, Julia
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1968
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9853
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f001_011_008.jpg
Transcript Page 8. October 20th, 1968: Russel Clapper, Manager of the Anahuac Refuge found two Masked Duoks in female plumage on the Anahuac Refuge on the morning of October 20th. He believes that these ducks were immature, 4 to 5 weeks old. On October 26th these same birds plus a third, also in female plumage, were seen at the same location by all who joined on the monthly fieldtrip. These sightings give rise to some interesting speculations. If the ducks seen at Anahuac were indeed immature, then they must have been raised there - not improbable because adults were seen in June and July. It is possible that the adults seen at the Brazoria Refuge were connected with the brood at Anahuac. Last year all adults had left by the time the young Masked Ducksabout 4 weeks old, an interesting speculation indeed! The sightings further suggest that the Masked Duck could be extending its range, or have they always been here, in small numbers, hidden in the coastal marshes, which were never very accessible. This does not seem unreasonable. The Anahuac Refuge has been with us since 1963, the Brazoria Refuge since 1966. On both refuges, the first sightings have been by the refuge managers, i. e. the ones who visit the refuges most often and should be able to recognize unusual birds. The refuges probably offer ideal habitat for this duek. Robin: by Noel Pettingell: None found in Rice University-Hermann Park area October 15 and 31. nor Kempner Park, Galveston October 19, nor Glenbrook Country Club (SE Houston) October 25. Upper Texas Coast seasonal status possibly should be changed from occasional to rare from September through November. Miscellaneous Articles re Bird Sightings Not Included in the Clearing House: Hotes on October 19 "Big Day-type Party Count - by Hoel Pettingell 135 species, including Rock Dove, were recorded by Party "A" - probably an all-time high for a single day in Oetober by one party in the Upper Texas Coast area. The route was the same as that of the June 17 and August 20 all-day counts. The timetable (CDT) by main areas (speeies totals in parentheses) was as follows: Leave 7146 Ilex, SE Houston 5 Sheldon and Lake Houston area 6:15 - 10 Anahuao Refuge 11:30 AM - 1 High Island 1:30 PM - 2 Bolivar Peninsula 2:30 " - 3 Galveston Island 3 = 55 " - 7 Arrive 7146 Ilex 8 55 AM 00 " 05 PM (82 - 98) 30 " 40 " 45 " (121 - 134) 25 " (135) The Rock Dove was not added to the list until 4 PM and a Barn Owl was spotted flying across the Gulf Freeway near W. P. Hobby Airport by Steve Williams at 8:15 - the 135th species. But the best bird of the day for Steve was a Red-breased Huthatch at High Island - a new one for his Life List. Car miles totaled 285, plus j\ on foot and 3.2 on Bolivar Ferry. Skies were for the most part clear and temperatures at Houston were 57 to 81, Beaumont 49 to 78, and Galveston 66 to 76. (Hoel did include some of the "better birds" of their list of a total of 135 species, in the Clearing House above.) From Bill McClure: Mike Ross at the McAshan Hall in Memorial Park is interested in tabulating the birds that have been seen in and near the park. He has been given a checklist with more than 100 sightings. It is requested that birders who spot any of the less common species within 2 miles of Memorial Park let Mike know at phone number 681-5544. On October 19, in my yard, I saw several Carolina Chickadees using a feeding technique that was new to me. The Chickadees examined the underside of the leaves of a hackberry tree and picked out a leaf, grasped it in the bill, twisted the head and popped the leaf off the twig. It was taken to a stronger limb and held in place with the left foot. They then peeked at the underside of the leaf several times and then discarded it. The routine was then repeated. The leaf always popped off at the first twist so they were obviously experienced at the procedure. I examined the leaves and found that they had a gall on the underside. The gall was about 1/5 inch in diameter and flat. Eaeh contained a small green larva with black eyes. It has been identified as the Hackberry Button Gall, Pachypsylla umbilicus. Texas' Fourth Ruff in Corpus Christi by Dan H. Hardy On October 19 and 20, I968, Tommy Schulenberg of Corpus Christi, making his weekly rounds