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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1957
Image 11
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1957 - Image 11. October 1957. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 29, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2246/show/2242.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1957). The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1957 - Image 11. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2246/show/2242

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1957 - Image 11, October 1957, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 29, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2246/show/2242.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1957
Contributor (Local)
  • Aiken, Carl H., III
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1957
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9842
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f007_010_011.jpg
Transcript Page 6 snail supplv and warden patrol where possible during the open shooting season Uninformed or thoughtless duck hunters are a great menace as the kite livesin duck marshes. As many as five dead kites have been found in fr0ntSoLar:mellalda^tioiiis°now underway The Fieri^ Audubon society, the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission and the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service have posted marshes and are giving publicity to tne necessity for protecting this bird. The National Audubon Society's warden, static ft Okeechobee? patrols ^e kite marshes through much of the year. An excellent film story of the Everglade Kite "Phantom of the Marshes , made bv Bayard W, Read, is available through these organizations. The original range of this kite embraced peninsular Florida in almost every extensive fresh-water marsh. It seems never to have penetrated further west than a north-south line from Tallahassee to St. Mark's. Occurring southward as far as the Tamiami Trail, comparatively few birds ever Inhabited the lower Everglades. Most of them were to be found in the St. John's River marshes (east), the Kissimmee River Valley (central) and the Lake Okeechobee and Everglades regions (south). It is not possible to- give even an estimate of the population In former days, but the speeies is known to have occurred in some numbers and was not difficult to find. „,_„>, The present United States range is reduced to a small segment of marsh in the southwestern corner of Lake Okeechobee, measuring roughly about two j and a half miles long by a mile and a half wide. Wandering individuals appear beyond such limits occasionally. Aside from this area, a part of the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Management Area, near the lower east coast of Florida, is inhabited by a few birds. This is the extent of the present range'. , ., ... Though no exact study has been made, those most familiar with the kits agree that there are less than 50 living today. Nesting success is not satisfactory and further study should be made to determine the factors responsible for this. The Everglade Kite desperately needs all the effort we can put forth in its behalf. ********************** Additions and Subtractions of the Big Bend Check List — "The following should be omitted from~Ehe~reeently published check list of Big Bend National Park: Mountain Chickadee, Common Crow, Harris'^Hawk, Mexican Goshawk, Sennet's White-tailed Hawk, Western Pigeon Hawk, Pinon Jay, Stellar's Jay, Red-backed Junco, Chestnut-collared and McGown's Longspurs, Clark's Nutcracker, White Pelican, Gambel's Quail, Williamson's Sapsucker, Field Sparrow, Sage Sparrow, Western Grasshopper Sparrow, Western Tree Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, Merrlam's Turkey, and Black-capped Vireo. The following should be added to the cheek list: American Raven, Western Lark Sparrow, Cassln's Purple Flneh, Swamp Sparrow, Mallard and Pintail, Red-billed Pigeon, Mexican Crested Flycatcher, Eastern Phoebe, Orange-crowned Warbler, Wilson's Warbler, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Dickclssel, Rusty Blackbird, Pied-billed Grebe, Sora Rail, Willet, and Louisiana Heron. ************** ******* MISCELLANEOUS CORRESPONDENCE Mrs. Minor A. Hurst - August 23, 1957 - Clifton, Texas It is very hot and dry In this country now--and the flood waters drowned the trees all around Lake Whitney--just ruined its beauty. We used to go over there quite often to watch for birds and have pienie lunch. We often saw the Canyon Wren and heard its beautiful wild call. The Golden- cheeked Warbler is there to. We do not believe any of the trees and brush will survive as the hot dry weather followed so closely on the flood. However, the Oanyon Wren visits us here now and then. It's wild and weird call awakened me this morning about sunrise--just outside my window on an old roek well. The Golden-cheeked Warbler visits us in spring but evidently does not nest in this locality. Recently we have had the Dark- backed Finch coming for water. Many House Finches are here; a pair nested in one of the large oaks and are now being followed by their little chirping youngsters. As usual many Cardinals and Lark Sparrows are here and many young were raised this summer. A pair of Field Sparrows and babies are