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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1957
Image 9
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1957 - Image 9. October 1957. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 29, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2246/show/2240.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1957). The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1957 - Image 9. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2246/show/2240

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1957 - Image 9, October 1957, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 29, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/2246/show/2240.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 6, October 1957
Contributor (Local)
  • Aiken, Carl H., III
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1957
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9842
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f007_010_009.jpg
Transcript Page 5 game refuge on the main lake where several thousand duoka, mostly Pintails, massed on the far shore. Hundreds of ducks flew over including Blue- winged Teal, Fulvous Tree Dueks, and Mallards. We also saw a Reddish Egret and a Spoonbill fly over along with several hawks circling too high for identification. At the other lake we added Wood Ibis (100), about 50 Black- crowned Night Herons, White-faced Glossy Ibis, and several more dueks of the species mentioned earlier. Just outside Longenbaugh on a barbed-wire fence I spotted another flycatcher-like bird whieh turned out to be a Vermilion Flycatcher (a beautiful male). Other birds seen included several Marsh Hawks, a Swainson's Hawk, a Red-tailed Hawk, an Empidonax Flycatcher, Red-shouldered Hawk, and many Sparrow Hawks„ We returned to Ronald's house about 1:15 p.m. with a total of 56 species on our list. *********** ******** THE ETORGLADE KITE - (Alexander Sprunt, Jr.) From"*0ur Endangered Wildlife", a publication of the National Wildlife Federation. This unique American bird of prey faces disaster. Now reduced to a population level that may be not much more than that of the famous Whooping Crane, its continued existence appears just as problematical. But while many thousands of people know about the crane, only a small minority are aware of the kite's predicament. Beautiful, graceful and entirely innocuous, it Is destined to become a bird of the past unless conservationists provide vigorous protection. Four pertinent facts must be recognized: 1. It has the most highly specialized food habits of any bird in this country, 2. It now occupies one of the most, If not the most, restricted range of any American bird north of Mexico, 3. It Is the third rarest bird of the United States, 4. It is probably the most susceptible to quick extirpation. Before touching on any of the above, what does this kite look like? Superficially, it bears a rather strong resemblance to the well-known Marsh Hawk, but any studied observation will reveal definite differences. The adult male is from 16 to 18 inches in length with a wing-spread of about 44 inches. The head, foreback and wing coverts are deep mouse-gray, the remainder of the body, wings and tail are blackish, the latter being crossed by a wide white band near the base, conspicuous in flight and visible from both above and below. The bill is long, slender and very strongly hooked, the iris bright red. The female Is dark brownish above, with much white marking on the head. The underparts are pinkish-buff, broadly streaked with brown!sh-black. Th« wings are very broad and the manner of flight, unlike that of the Marsh Hawk's titling and veering, is perfectly level and deliberate. Aside from its physical appearance, the outstanding characteristic of this kite is the highly selective diet. It eats a single speoies of freshwater snail and nothing else. It is, therefore, confined to a fresh-water habitat harboring this creature (Pomaeea ealiginosa) and cannot be expected elsewhere. Within the United States it is found only in Florida and it has not, to the writer's knowledge, ever been seen in any other part of the country. It also occurs in Cuba, eastern Mexico, Central America, and a close relative Is found in South America. Although once fairly well distributed over Florida in suitable localities, the Everglade Kite Is now reduced to a remnant because of changes in its natural environment. Many marshes have been drained with the consequent disappearance of the snail, followed almost at once by the disappearance of the kite. Its obvious hawk-like aspect has resulted in thoughtless gunners killing it for no other reason than that. Its increasing rarity"has led collectors to seek both skins and eggs. These three factors-have been responsible for bringing it to its present low point. Its continued survival and any increase will depend on broadened public interest,- posting of the remaining habitat, a careful wateh on any project dealingswith the raising or lowering of water levels which would affect thy