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The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 11, November 1995
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 11, November 1995 - Image 4. November 1995. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/224/show/217.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1995). The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 11, November 1995 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/224/show/217

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 11, November 1995 - Image 4, November 1995, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/224/show/217.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 11, November 1995
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1995
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 17
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9880
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f017_011_004.jpg
Transcript jh-i., - JUP/6*JVC&r ' ^Dawd cB/tae(.o/td PERSOMAL HIGH My best day of birding was probably New Year's Day 1988. Garland Porter and I viewed Crane Hawk, Golden- crowned Warbler and Clay-colored Robin in a period of about four hours. But the day 1 want to tell you about was a truly memorable experience that would not have happened had I not been a "listing" birder with a good birding buddy who is ready to depart anytime, any day. It all started at the dentist's office. Dr. Cemy rated the extraction on a 9.5 out often on the difficulty-to- extract scale. After 45 minutes of nerve-tearing agony, four, once firmly- rooted wisdom teeth, now lay on the table top. I drove home with bloody spittle oozing onto the front of my shirt. Thoughts of missing my first day of work due to illness since 1981 pounded in my head. My wife, Dody, arrived home from work, looked at my shirt and overall condition and called a substitute teacher to handle my classes. As I lay on the couch that evening sucking ice and feeling miserable, I began to think. I could be miserable anywhere! Why, I could be miserable in the back seat of Garland's car heading north to Dallas' Southside Wastewater Treatment Facility to find the male Eurasian Wigeon spotted several days earlier. I called Garland. He realized, due to my condition, there was a possibility of having to abort the trip before a successful sighting but, he also realized the import of a Eurasian Wigeon in Texas. At 4:00 a.m. Friday, October 29, 1993, we headed north. Under cool, dark skies we were met by an employee of the sewage plant. He was to take us onto the grounds and show us the wigeon Within an hour we would be heading south, back to the warm comfort of our homes. Plans did not go as expected. He showed us where the wigeon had been in days past and gave us a tour of his facility. Hours passed. The weather turned foul with colder temperatures, drizzling rain and increasing winds. Eventually our guide returned to work, but kindly, allowed us to continue our search. There were plenty of ducks and especially large flocks of American Wigeon, which we scanned in desperation. Around 1:00 pjn., I had enough. The pain in my mouth was too much. It was cold and wet, and I wanted to go home. I broached the idea of going home, but I could see Garland was thinking "wigeon," Eurasian Wigeon. Finally I slurred a message to him and laid down in the back seat of the car. I felt this strategy would work. He would wait another minute or two and then swing the car south for the long drive home. To my dismay and discomfort, the car went west—back to the sewer hole where there once had been a Eurasian Wigeon. The weather was deteriorating even further. Morale was low. Mine was as low as the bottom of the pits where I once had teeth. I figured a little longer wouldn't be too bad Garland wanted to drive the south side of a pond we had searched from the north shore earlier and would use the window-mounted scope from the car. The rain was coming down in sheets now. I figured he would call it quits before long. Then we could head home. While driving on the dirt area just south of the pond, I decided the next time Garland stopped the car, I'd get a coke out of the cooler in the trunk. With coke in hand and surprisingly, with binoculars still around my neck, I closed the trunk and flushed a small flock of wigeons from a concealed roost along the near shore. And—there it was. Lifer #488. No more than ten meters away—the male Eurasian Wigeon. For several seconds the small flock remained stationary, allowing a great view through the wind-driven rain. The birds flew as Garland emerged from the car., .expecting to see his life bird. I was only able to show him the flock with the E. Wigeon as it flew away. To our surprise, the flock quickly settled down about 80 meters distant. As we enjoyed our prolonged views, the wind, rain, cold and pain disappeared momentarily, but, after a few minutes, we realized it was pouring rain and thick, sticky, car-inimobilizing mud clung to the bottom of our shoes. As sheets of rain pelted us and softened the ground, we jumped into the car and slinging mud, we made it onto the asphalt and we headed home. Home! On a scale of one to ten, I'd rank this event about a 9.5. David Bradford, a biology teacher at Westbury High School, is East Texas Sub-Regional Editor for National Audubon's Field Notes, vice- president/programs for Houston Audubon Society and executive vice- president of the ONC. A birding trip leader for Penfeathers, David's Texas List stands at 512, his ABA list at 615. • Page A