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The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 11, November 1995
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 11, November 1995 - Image 1. November 1995. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/224/show/214.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1995). The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 11, November 1995 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/224/show/214

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 11, November 1995 - Image 1, November 1995, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/224/show/214.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 44, No. 11, November 1995
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1995
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 17
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9880
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f017_011_001.jpg
Transcript The Volume 44, No. 11 November 1995 Spoonbil Published by The Ornithology Group, Outdoor Nature Club, Houston Uncertain Future for Swainson's Hawks by Brian Woodbridge Swainson's Hawks (Buteo swainsoni) are long-distance neotropical migrants, breeding in grassland and shrub steppe habitats of the U.S. and Canada, and wintering in similar habitats in southern South America. Habitat modification in breeding areas and in Latin America, environmental contaminants, shooting along migration routes and pesticide contamination have contributed to declines in western U.S. populations of this species. Although habitat relationships on their breeding range are understood, little is known about habitat use or potential threats to the Swainson's Hawk in Latin America. Using satellite-capable radio transmitters attached to two wild Swainson's Hawks, the Forest Service monitored the hawks' migratory pathway from northern California through Mexico, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Brazil and Bolivia to Argentina. The hawks ultimately settled in the northern part of the province of La Pampa, near the town of Colonel Hilario Lagos. In January and early February 1995, we visited Argentina to investigate the species' behavior and habitat use, and to establish contact with researchers and governmental agencies involved in bird conservation. Based on the latest telemetry readings from our two hawks, we established a study area encompassing 6400 square kilometers (4000 square miles) and began mapping the species' foraging areas and roost sites. Our study area supported a spectacular concentration of Swainson's Hawk. We located several communal night roosts containing from 2000 to over 7000 hawks, and many smaller roosts containing less than 200 hawks. During the day, we observed large flocks of hawks (from 60 to thousands) foraging for insects in the air and on the ground, in pastures and cultivated fields. The primary prey appeared to be a small grasshopper, locally known as "tucura" (Dichronplus spp.). Night roosts were typically in groves of eucalyptus trees planted at farm entrances and headquarters. Unfortunately, in La Pampa, high-input agricultural practices producing such commodities as corn, soya and sunflower are swiftly replacing the traditional low-intensity agricultural practices of cattle grazing and hay production due to worldwide market trends. (See Swainson 's on Page 5)