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The Spoonbill, Vol. [36], No. 4, April 1987
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The Spoonbill, Vol. [36], No. 4, April 1987 - Image 4. April 1987. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/213/show/208.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1987). The Spoonbill, Vol. [36], No. 4, April 1987 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/213/show/208

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. [36], No. 4, April 1987 - Image 4, April 1987, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/213/show/208.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. [36], No. 4, April 1987
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 4, April 1987; The Spoonbill, Vol. XVII, No. 4, April 1987
Contributor (Local)
  • Price, Libby
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date April 1987
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9872
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
Note Incorrect volume number, XVII, printed on front page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f001_004_004.jpg
Transcript MASKED BOBWHITE RELEASE PROGRAM AT THE BUENOS AIRES NWR by Mary Ann Chapman After a limited effort in 1985, the first full- scale Masked Bobwhite release program was conducted at Arizona's Buenos Aires NWR in 1986. The . program began on March 25 with receipt of the first shipment of adult male Northern Bobwhite from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, and ended when the last coveys were released in December. During the winter and spring reintroduction facilities were almost doubled by construction of 14 new holding pens and 20 new runs, enlargement of the screened holding enclosure to accomodate the new pens and purchase of two additional brooders. We now have a holding capacity of 280 Northern Bobwhite adult foster parents and 360 Masked Bob- white chicks. We receive shipments of 300 chicks each, which we divide into broods of 15. During March and April four shipments of adult Northern Bobwhite arrived. In May and June refuge personnel were busy surgically sterilizing 246 adults, with a very low mortality of only 4 birds. Sterilization prevents them from interbreeding with Masked Bobwhite in future years. Males are used because they are easier to sterilize than females and are equally good parents. Eight shipments of chicks from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife captive breeding facility at Patuxent, Maryland, began on July 16 and continued every two weeks until October 29. A total of 2,079 chicks were received, most of which were three weeks old. Chick mortality prior to release is primarily due to stress caused by shipping. The loss in 1987 was 18%, up from 11% in 1985 mainly because of problems with airline schedules. Refuge staff tried to minimize the loss by meeting flights upon arrival, rushing the chicks to the refuge and immediately feeding sugar water to each of the 300. Though tedious, this remedy seemed to aid survival. Chicks were then placed into heated brooders in which male adults had already been acclimated. After about a day to recover from shipping stress, the heat was turned down, forcing the chicks to seek warmth around the male. About 24 hours was allowed to determine whether the adult was adopting the brood. If not, another male was tried. When adoption was successful, the birds were left in the brooder for about a week and then placed in a run for another week to become accustomed to outdoor conditions and learn feeding behaviors. Then about five weeks old, the chicks were released with their foster parent. When adoption did not occur on the second attempt the chicks were left in the brooder with the second male and gradually weaned off the heat over about a two-week period. Then they were placed in runs for about a month before being released at an age of 8-10 weeks. Often during that period a covey bond developed: the male seemed to develop some affinity for the chicks and became protective of them even though he had not adopted them in the brooder. In 1986 56% of the adult males introduced to broods adopted them. Most broods were adopted by either the first or second male, resulting in 109 broods released while still chicks. An additional 19 groups were released as immatures in coveys, for a total of 126 releases and 1,699 chicks released. All releases were south of Arivaca Road which bisects the refuge about twelve miles north of the Mexican border, in a no-quail-hunting closure area. Scaled Quail males and females were used as foster parents on a limited experimental basis. Of nine adoption attempts, six resulted in releases. Two Of the broods were subsequently seen on several occasions, and one was known to have failed. In December three Masked Bobwhite originally released in two different Scaled Quail broods were trapped in a covey consisting of Masked Bobwhite only. If all foster parents could be Scaled Quail we could eliminate the cost of obtaining Northern Bobwhite and the effort of sterilizing them, since they would not interbreed with the Masked Bob- white. In 1987 the biological and behavioral aspects and implications of using Scaled Quail will be studied further. In February of 1986 some Masked Bobwhite trapped from the wild in Mexico were added to the Patuxent breeding stock to maintain genetic viability. About 160 of our chicks in late 1986 shipments were descendents of the new adults. The 1987 release program will include two changes. No. 1: So far the program has been timed to coincide with the natural nesting period of the masked Bobwhite, which comes after the summer rains. However, Northern Bobwhite nest in Texas in the spring. Therefore in an attempt to increase the rate of adoptions we will move our release program about a month earlier, beginning in late June or early July and continuing through September. No. 2: This year we will begin releasing birds north of Arivaca Road, with supplemental releases south of the road. The Masked Bobwhite goal established in the refuge draft master plan is an average self- sustaining population of 750 birds, and peak numbers of 1,250. This exceeds the single population goal set forth by the overall Masked Bobwhite recovery plan. This data was taken from a report prepared by Steve J. Dobrott, refuge biologist and chief mother hen of the Masked Bobwhite. NON-BOBWHITE NOTES: In addition to four species of quail (Gambel's, Scaled, Montezuma and Masked Bobwhite), the refuge features a delicious assortment of other Arizona specialties including most of Patagonia's claims to fame: Thick-billed Kingbird, Rose-throated Becard, Northern Beardless Tyrannulet and Gray Hawk, the last three nesting. The birding highlights so far at my house, one of the refuge hot spots, were the Five-striped Sparrow found by Ben Feltner at my windmill in August, and the Painted Bunting which I found in my bird bath in October. Birders came from Phoenix to add it to their state lists. My sincere apologies to the few people who were planning to visit last year, when my plans and good intentions were totally discombobulated by the five-day 11,000-acre wildfire which disrupted our lives in May. If you let me know of a planned