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The Spoonbill, Vol. [36], No. 4, April 1987
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The Spoonbill, Vol. [36], No. 4, April 1987 - Image 2. April 1987. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/213/show/206.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1987). The Spoonbill, Vol. [36], No. 4, April 1987 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/213/show/206

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. [36], No. 4, April 1987 - Image 2, April 1987, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/213/show/206.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. [36], No. 4, April 1987
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 4, April 1987; The Spoonbill, Vol. XVII, No. 4, April 1987
Contributor (Local)
  • Price, Libby
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date April 1987
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9872
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
Note Incorrect volume number, XVII, printed on front page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f001_004_002.jpg
Transcript by Noel Pettingell TEN YEARS AGO THIS MONTH FROM APRIL, 1977 SPOONBILL "SPECIAL REPORTS TO THE CLEARING HOUSE Possible nesting of a Hooded Merganser in Ft. Bend County On March 4, 1977 several members of the OG team doing a bird survey for the TP&W Dept. on the Hale Ranch Park Site in Ft. Bend County observed a female Hooded Merganser as it flew into a hole about 20 feet up on the side of a dead pecan tree. An examination of the hole on the next day revealed one egg in the nest. Weather conditions prevented further examination or observation at the site until April 8, at which time the nest was found to contain 5 or 6 eggs. The merganser was not seen on the April date, and the park manager had not seen any mergansers for some time. Further observation and examination will be made. Observers in the original party were Mary Ann Chapman, T. Ben Feltner and C. Dean Fisher. There are no prior nesting reports by [sic] Hooded Mergansers in Texas.~C-H Editor" THIRTY YEARS AGO THIS MONTH FROM APRIL, 1957 SPOONBILL "Gannet found in Galveston On March 23rd, 1957, Mr. & Mrs. S. G. Kersh- ner, Susan and Tommy Kershner, Ralph Peterson and John O'Neill made a birding trip to Galveston. All were interested in birds but Tommy Kershner was also working on his bird study merit badge. "Along West beach they came upon what was thought to be a dead pelican washed up on the shore. After pulling it out of the sand, field guides were studied and it was discovered that the bird was an immature gannet. "John who is an expert at mounting birds, took the gannet home and at the meeting of the Houston Ornithology Group on April 11, he displayed a mounted Laughing gull, a Screech owl and the immature gannet, all beautifully mounted and ii perfect condition. "The gannet is 'listed on our checklist as an accidental visitant. The only other recent record of this species in Galveston was an immature captured alive by George Williams and Lawrence Tab- ony on September 20, 1952. Identification was verified by Prof. George Williams of Rice Institute." SAN JACINTO: continued from page 1 Almost all the birds at San Jacinto Park are found at the south end on the large sand bars. This area is open to vehicles in summer and has a picnic area with a rest-room. A visit to this area in summer and fall will always produce from 4 to 80 Wood Storks! These magnificent birds arrive here in early June and leave by October. They always associate with the Roseate Spoonbills to produce unparalleled beauty. This is the only spot near Houston besides Brazoria NWR where you are almost certain to find them. However, at San Jacinto they are quite tame and can be viewed from as close as 20 yards. In the evenings, watch them as they fly into the tall trees for their nightly roost. Summer also brings many other coastal species that loaf in the sandy areas. Regular birds at this time include American White Pelican, Reddish Egret, Mottled Duck, Pied-billed Grebe, Clapper Rail and Laughing Gull. Terns are abundant, including Caspian, Royal, Forster's, Least and Black. Black Skimmers fly about making their unusual "barking" calls. Great Blue Heron, Great and Snowy Egrets and Tricolored Heron can be seen throughout the extensive marshy area. Even the rare Osprey occurs during the hot humid summer. As summer fades into fall the park begins attracting new residents. Late November brings the largest raft of Hofoded Mergansers on the entire UTC littoral region. Indeed this is the only area on the UTC that I have enjoyed these handsome ducks. They are easiest to find on cold, damp, blustery days at the north end by an old submerged chain-link fence. During these cold spells I have counted up to 83, but on warm days I always find fewer than 15. If you see the wintering group of 200 Black-crowned Night-Herons, you are in the correct area of the park. Other ducks that are found in winter include Green-winged Teal, Northern Pintail, Northern Shoveler, Gadwall and a tremendous raft of 2000 Lesser Scaup. Shorebirds are very common on the sand flats in migration and winter. You can always find Black- bellied and Semipalmated Plovers. In winter you should see American Avocet, Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, Willet, Spotted Sandpiper, Sanderling, Western and Least Sandpipers and Dunlin. Mixed flocks of dowitchers also winter in large concentrations. Common Snipe are occasionally seen feeding in the marshy area. Listen for calling Northern Flickers and singing Pine Warblers during this time. During fall migration in August and September be on the lookout for migrating White Ibis. Herons and egrets begin showing up in tremendous numbers. Black-necked Stilts, Solitary and Stilt Sandpipers put in brief appearances. Check the hedge-rows for Blue-winged Warblers, Yellow-breasted Chat and Orchard and Baltimore Orioles. The park also has a permanent avian population that can appeal to numerous birders. Olivaceous Cormorants can always be found preening on the old pilings. Ospreys have been recorded every month perching in the dead tree snags. Belted Kingfishers call constantly as they dive for fish. Red- shouldered Hawks, Blue Jay, Common Yellowthroat and Seaside Sparrows reside year round. Indeed I have recorded a total of 135 species since I started birding this park in 1985.