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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957
Image 9
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957 - Image 9. November 1957. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/204/show/198.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1957). The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957 - Image 9. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/204/show/198

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957 - Image 9, November 1957, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/204/show/198.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957
Contributor (Local)
  • Aiken, Carl H., III
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1957
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9842
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f007_011_009.jpg
Transcript Page 5 secured before our attention was diverted from the reeds and mud flats to a flicker perched atop a Live Oak. With the dark bark providing a perfect background, it was no problem to identify it as a Red-shafted Flicker (Rare Winter Resident). As we approached, it flew across an open field toward the monument, the bright red of its wing linings gleaming In the early morning sun. A pond further down the road provided a Pied-billed Grebe, Little Blue Heron, and a Forester's Tern, while Peggy Lake supported several large rafts of White Pelicans. The woods here were very nonproductive so all agreed to proceed to Miller Road. Female Indigo Buntings were numerous and in a patch of woods near Alexander Island a Cooper's Hawk was found flying low over the trees. An Eastern Kingbird was also spotted in the vicinity, Baytown Tunnel was the next stop but the water was rather high and most of the birds had left for parts unknown. Nevertheless, Laughing Gulls crowded a portion of the narrow beaeh and Ruddy Turnstones and a Ringed Plover played near a large log. Seissor-tail Flycatchers often gather here to migrate and there were five or six individuals proudly representing their species for the last time before returning south. Hundreds of Black Skimmers lined the north side of Hog Island but the fishermen had frightened most of the other birds. Steve introduced us to a marsh in Baytown which has often proved itself a magnet for rare birds. We found no rare birds this time but a Least Bittern and Anhinga were noted, the Anhinga performing with all Its known skill. From Baytown we made a hurried dash to Seabrook and Kemah, only to find that the wind had Increased and was hindering observation considerably. All was quiet at the familiar spots until we reached the "jungle" at Kemah. Here a bright patch of yellow darted across the trail and was quickly Identified as a beautiful male Pileolated Warbler. This was the beginning of a small wave of migrants which included a Magnolia Warbler, an Ovenbird, three Parula Warblers, a Blaek-&-white Warbler, a Black-throated Green, and another Catbird. We later realized that while these speoies were being observed, the wind was blowing very little. This set up a small replica of the spring migration waves along the coast. The wind had forced the migrants Into the bushes and here they had remained still- and silent, except where the woods were thick enough to afford protection for easy movement. South of Kemah, four Snow Geese breasted the south wind and a Marsh Hawk appeared In its usual place near Texas City. We changed our schedule slightly at Galveston and instead of covering the west end of the island first, we went to the jetties at the southeast corner. Our main purpose, which was to find the Cabot's Tern, was fulfilled as no less than 61 individuals of that speoies flocked, along the flats east of the jeTHTies. There were Herring, Laughing, and Ring-billed Gulls with them as well as a few Royal Terns. After a long and careful study of the terns we made our way to Duck Lake where seven species were added: Canvasback, Eared Grebe, Coots (2), Mallards (2), Pintail, Ruddy Ducks (2), and several Shovelers. Here the fifth Belted Kingfisher was also added to our list. While proceeding out S Road, Steve spotted a Western Kingbird flying overhead and another perched defiantly on a near-by fence. Birding at Mulberry Grove has virtually come to a stand still since all of the buildings are being removed as well as some of the trees. It is possible that this, the best birding locality on Galveston Island, is a thing of the past. After our short visit to the grove and golf course we again headed west on Stewart Road, intensely watching the bushes and fields for signs of life. As the corner at 13 Mi. Road was reached Steve began yelling and motioning toward the side of the road. There in a bush about twenty feet from the pavement sat a GROOVE-BILLED AMI. Naturally the exltment of the first few seconds left us not very ornithologlcaly minded, but after thi3 brief time elapsed we parked the car and studied this accidental visitor from the tip of its loosely attached tail to its parrot-like bill. Both its wings and tall were ragged which indicated to us that it had probably made a rather long and strenious flight. We also heard its tropical call accompanied by a slight jerk of the tail. After recording a female Blue Grosbeak which had appeared for a short while on a barbed-wire fence, we started back along the beach. Six Knots fed leisurely near the surf but that was the extent of the new species here. About 5:00 p.m. our small party found itself at Kempner Park frantically trying to pick up a few more birds. A female Ruby-throat was all that satisfied our need for new speeies so we headed for Houston.