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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957
Image 7
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957 - Image 7. November 1957. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/204/show/196.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1957). The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957 - Image 7. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/204/show/196

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957 - Image 7, November 1957, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/204/show/196.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957
Contributor (Local)
  • Aiken, Carl H., III
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1957
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9842
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f007_011_007.jpg
Transcript Page 4 late May and early June, In the days of its maximum abundance, a few birds straggled eastward to western New York, Long Island, Cape Cod and Calais, Maine. In the fall there was a pronounced easterly drift from the breeding grounds, causing the birds to arrive on the coasts of Labrador in huge flocks and they were also well known south Into Nova Scotia, It was at this point In their journey that they put out to sea. If there were severe storms or northeasterly gales In late August and September they would appear In great flocks on the coasts of Massachusetts, Nantucket, Long Island, and New Jersey, but would depart again as soon as the weather moderated. There also are a few sporadic records of Eskimo Curlews for Bermuda, Barbados and a large number for eastern Brazil, But apparently during those years when the weather was favorable most of the individuals flew without stopping from Nova Seotia to the wintering grounds. This was a long, dangerous flight with no stops for food and rest. There are no definite statistics on the Eskimo Curlew, but it was common in flocks during spring, fall and winter. In days of maximum abundance stragglers were reported in northeast Siberia, Greenland, Great Britian, Iceland and Ireland. There are no authentic records for the Pacific Coast of the United States, and all reports from the Atlantic Coast states south of New Jersey are doubtful. The Eskimo Curlew was delicious eating, an epicurean's delight. In fall it was so fat that when shot on the wing, it sometimes burst upon striking the ground. Hence the gunner's name dough or doe bird. There seems to be no question that merciless market gunning was responsible for its rapid decline. This was seemingly hastened by the gentle, confiding disposition of these birds and what appeared to be an inborn sympathy for their fallen companions. Experienced gunners could eliminate a whole flock at a time and wagon loads of dead and rotting curlews were common along both the spring and fall migration routes. By the late 1890's everyony knew that the Eskimo curlew was headed for extinction, and we are forced to conclude that complete protection did not come in time. Other similarly endangered shoreblrds, with the same dangerous migration route, such as the Golden Plover and Hudsonian Godwlt, have staged a really spectacular and unexpected comeback In recent decades„ But there Is no reasonable basis for the hope that the Eskimo Curlew can be restored! Last specimens of record were collected in Argentina in 1924, when one bird was taken out of a group of five or six. Other recent records include birds collected at Labrador in 1932, at Cape Cod, Massachusetts in 1915, and New York In 1893. There have been a few sight records since, but these are subject to conjecture .because of the fact that modern observers have no opportunity to familiarize themselves with the species and all possible characters cannot be obtained in one observations eight birds were reported from Nebraska in 1926; two birds were seen after a northeast gale on Long Island, New York, in 1932; two were observed at Ipswich, Michigan, after a northeast gale in 1933; two were reported at Galveston Island, Texas, in April 1945. This scattering-©"?" individuals does not leave much ground for hope that the bird will survive and no possibility for management exists except through complete protection. The Eskimo Curlew is to be tallied among those speoies which man has destroyed. May he learn from the grave mistakes he has made with this animal so that others will be spared a similar fate. * * * * * ************ October Birding - (Carl Aiken) The morning of October 13, 1957, dawned bright, clear and windless, thus providing a perfect situation for studying fall migrants along the Gulf Coast. Vic Emanuel, Steve Williams, and myself were in the San Jacinto Battlegrounds area by 7:30 a.m. Steve pointed out several new birding spots near the refineries and chemical plants In the vicinity and it was here that the first fall migrants and winter residents appeared. Nashville Warblers, Indigo Buntings, Rough-winged Swallows, Sparrow Hawks, a Catbird, a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Brown Thrashers, Yellow-shafted Flickers, a House Wren and several Bluebirds were recorded with very little difficulty^ From here we made our way to the Battlegrounds and a small ditch where water and shore birds are usually seen. Several species were quickly