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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957
Image 5
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957 - Image 5. November 1957. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/204/show/194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1957). The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957 - Image 5. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/204/show/194

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957 - Image 5, November 1957, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/204/show/194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 6, No. 7, November 1957
Contributor (Local)
  • Aiken, Carl H., III
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1957
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 7
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9842
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 5
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f007_011_005.jpg
Transcript Page 3 Balscope Available "°"ABaTscope Is" now available to members of the Ornithology Group for rental ($1.00 per day) at any time when it is not in use on a regular 0. G. field trip. The scope is in charge of the Field Trip Chairman, Miss Ruth Moorman, Sam Houston Hotel (San Jaeinto and Prairie), GA-2-1351, It will be rented on a rotation basis and members wishing to use the scope on private trips should make arrangements with Miss Moorman as far in advance as possible. The scope is not a substitute for binoculars but Is best suited for distant shore or water birds. Can be set-up either on a tripod or ear window. A-B-C Sale at December 4th Meeting In or3irTo~earh"ibney to pay for the scope, the Balscope Committee has planned an Auction-Bazaar and Cake sale to be held in conjunction with the December 4th regular meeting. Members have been asked to check their "hall closets" for useful items whieh have been stored away and no longer used --- but which might appeal to a purchaser at our sale. Those having articles to donate should notify any member of the Balscope Committee. Home-made cakes, pies, cookies, etc. will also be on sale and a most outstanding bargain will be coffee and cake served for only 15jzfl The sale and meeting will be held at the Women's Club, 407 Stratford. Stratford Is a short street and rather tricky to locate. The easiest way Is to go to the corner of Westheimer and Taft, (there's a traffic light at that corner) drive two blocks north on Taft to Stratford -- then one block west on Stratford to No. 407 which is the Women's Club and the meeting. The salesroom will open at 6:00 p.m. with the first auctions between 7:00 and 7:30, The program will consist of a movie at 8:00 with more auctions and sales after the picture. This should be an Interesting evening so come and bring guests'. Balscope Committee = Leota Stilwell (Chairman), Thelma Smith, Carrie Holcomb, Louise and Henry Hoffman, Josiephine Wilkin, Edna Miner, Norma Oates, and Ruth Moorman. THE ESKIMO CURLEW = (Ludlow Grlscom) From ™^ur~Endangered Wildlife", a publication of the National Wildlife Federation. The Eskimo Curlew is one of the smallest of a group of shorebirds characterized by their fairly large size, brownish-streaked coloration, and arched or decurved bills. It is from 12 to 14 inches in length and has a downcurved bill from if to 2-J inches in length. Its darkest coloration is seen above and on top of the head In the feathers with warm buffy-brown tips. Underparts are conspicuously lighter. The bill is arched, slightly downcurved only. Technically, the Eskimo Curlew is the only curlew in the world with unbarred primaries. Cinnamon-buff wing linings are conspicuous in flight. The legs are green. In older books and manuals the Eskimo and Hudsonian Curlews are badly confused, the bill length and leg color were given erroneously and the mor* technical characters omitted. Actually, the Hudsonian Curlew is much larger having a total length of 15-18 inches, and a downcurved bill that is 2f-4 inches long. It Is more uniformly colored than the Eskimo Curlew, grayish- brown with head more sharply striped, the primaries always barred, and no bright color in the wing linings. The legs are dull grayish blue or bright bluish gray in color. It becomes apparent that many sight records of Eskimo Curlew have been erroneous, nothing but young, small Hudsonians with particularly short bills. And many actual specimens have been wrongly identified. The call or flight notes of the Hudsonian are loud, rapid whistled ku-ku-ku-ku-ku, that of the Eskimo a sharp squeak with a squealing quality suggesting a single note of the Common Tern, only weaker, Henoe the New England name "bee bird". Eskimo Curlews formerly occurred In flocks of several thousands. They were known to breed entirely within the arctic from northern Mackenzie to Arctic Alaska, but only 32 definite nests and eggs have been recorded. These birds follow a double migration route to wintering areas in the pampas of southern South America, Uruguay, Argentina and Patagonia, The course followed on the return trip in spring is unknown as there are only two migrant records, one from Guatemala and one from Mexico. Birds once arrived in numbers on the coastal prairies of eastern Texas in March and then moved north through the Great Plains states in April and May to reach Canada in