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The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960
Image 11
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960 - Image 11. May 1960. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1955/show/1949.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1960). The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960 - Image 11. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1955/show/1949

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960 - Image 11, May 1960, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1955/show/1949.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. IX, No. 1, May 1960
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Emanuel, Victor L.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1960
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 13
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9845
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f013_005_011.jpg
Transcript page 11 A flock of Golden Plover dropped in from ahigh altitude flight. Several Nighthawks appeared and directly over the Gulf we identified two White-tailed Kites. By this time the skies were leaden gray and we decided to go to Lafitte's Grove since it represented the closest accessible- group of trees. When we arrived there was only one bird there - a Redstart. This was a short lived count however, for the birds began arriving almost as soon as we did. Within fifteen minutes the grove was literally full of birds. I estimated between 250 and 300,about 80$ of them warblers. In the oaks al around there were Indigo Buntings, Simmer Tanagers,. Orchard and Baltimore Orioles, Blue Grosbeaks, Tennessee, Yellow, Black & White, Blue-winged, and Blackpoll Warblers. It was ohvious that many of the birds were quite tire* - one group containing 3 or 4 Indigo Buntings, 2 Orchard Orioles, 2 Baltimore Orioles, and a. Redstart, sat quiei$y in the crown of an oak just under the canopy of leaves. They did not move at all. On the other hand, most of the warblers began nervously flitting from place to place, feeding immediately on landing. Looking up into the sky we could see birds dropping into the available cover by the dozens and half dozens. Unfortunately by now it was so dark that only about a quarter of the birds could be identified. Even the birds were having trouble seeing, for a Wood Thrush missed hitting me full in the face by a last minute veer that carried it to a nearby perch. With just enough light left to see color, we departed for Mulberry Grove #1. Here the same thing had occurred, but it was now impossible to tell one bird from another so we gave up for the day. On the following morning, April 18, I returned to Lafitte's Grove with Nancy Strickling, the H. S. Hoffmans, and my wife, Anne. The yove was inundated with migrants — twenty species of warblers, both orioles, numerous Indigo Buntings, and about 8 or 9 Rose- breasted Grosbeaks. The prevalent warbler here was Tennessee and Hooded each with a count of 30 odd, 25 - 30 Kentucky Warblers, and the same for Black & White. Not nearly so abundant, but still common were Chestnut-sided Warblers, Redstarts, Cerulean Warblers, Black-throated Green, Golden-winged Warbler, and Blue-winged Warbler. The real discoveries came, in the form of three Blackpoll Warblers, and a demure little Swainson's Warbler making like, as Towhee in the leaves on the ground. On to Nottingham Ranch Road and woods where again Kentucky and Hooded Warblers took high count, running over 100 birds in each species. Another Swainson's Warbler feeding beside his book partner, the Worm-eating Warbler. From Nottingham Ranch area; we went to MulbeflPy Grove #2. Here the predominant warblers were Cerulean, and Chestnut-sided, about 20 of each. The predominant bird was the Blue Grosbealc. An estimate of 50 was conservative. They even outnumbered the Indigo Buntings at this spot. Here we also got a Martin which reflected Iright blue as he launched out of the salt cedars. It was necessary for me to leave the island at 2:3© p.m., but I did stop by Kempner long enough to count 17 Worm-eating Warblers - quite aa high count for ai5 M.(Casual Migrant) Hist of. Migrants: Eastern Pewee - 18, Sora - 5, Scarlet Tanager - 1, Summer Tanager - 13, Gray-cheekad Thrush - 2, Swainson's Thrush - 5, Wood Thrush - 25, Veery - 1, Red-eyed Vireo - 12, White-eyed Vireo - 7, Yellow-throated Vireo - 2, Warbling Vireo - 2, Chestnut-sided Warbler - 20, Redstart - 28, Yellow Warbler - 13, Cerulean Warbler - 25, Black & White Warbler - 50, Sycamore Warbler - 5, Blackpoll Hjnrbler - 3, Parula Warbler - 2, Black-throated Green Warbler - 2, Hooded Warbler - 200, Kentucky Warbler - 200, Golden- winged Warbler - 20, Blue-winged Warbler - 20, Blackburnian Warbler - 3, Swainson's Warbler- 2, Erethonotary Warbler - 1, Worm-eating Warbler - 25, Myrtle Warbler - 1, Tennessee Warbler - 75, Northern Water Thrush - 1, Ovenbird - 2, Orange-crowned Warbler - 1, Nashville Warbler - 1, Indigo Buntings - 500, Painted Bunting - 3, Catbirds - 7, Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 6, Black-billed Cuckoo. - 3, Blue Grosbeak - 65, Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. - 7, Pigeon Hawk (Merlin) - 1, Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 5, Baltimore Oriole - 30, Orchard Oriole - 25. ARLIE MCKAY REPORTS FROM COVE FOR APRIL. April 18: I was in the field 90$ of the day - 110 species; April 24: I got 100 species, out 60$ of the day; April 26: out 50$, 110 species. I was out 60$ to 80$ of the 2nd, 5th, 10th,. 13th,. and 28th getting from 75 to 92 per day. T was out all day only on the 9th mostly in Galveston - 96 species +-. Edgar Kincaid and Fred Webster - for me, unexpected specimens,., and lifers as well. My collection for the month-Was 190 species, plus others seen out of the Cove area$ such as these on the Galveston trip: Common locn - 4, Cabots Tern - 8, Brown Pelican - 34, White-faced Ibis - 9, Cattle Egret - 2, Reddish Egret - 3, Common Gallinule - 15 eat., Avocet - 1, Wilson's Plover - 2, Horned Lark - 20 est., Sharp-tailed Sparrow - 1, Inca Dove - 6, Vermiiyjiai Flycatcher - 1, Marbled Godwit - 4, Stilt Sandpiper - 8,