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The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960 - Image 10. May 1960. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 8, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1955/show/1948.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1960). The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960 - Image 10. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1955/show/1948

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960 - Image 10, May 1960, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 8, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1955/show/1948.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. IX, No. 1, May 1960
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Emanuel, Victor L.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1960
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 13
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9845
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f013_005_010.jpg
Transcript page 10 ESKIMO CURLEW AI GALVESTON. APRIL 3. I960 BY VICTOR L. EMANUEL On March 26- and 27, I searched unsuccessfully for the Eskimo Curlew on Galveston, first with Raul Cornell and then with T. B. Feltner. On April 2, Leota Stilwell and Norma) Oates saw a. suspicious looking curlew on Galveston, but rain which started shortly after they sighted it prevented them from seeing it at close range. On April 3, Steve Williams, Carl H. Aiken, and I went down to Galveston early. We searched for the Eskimo Curlew all day. At 3:55 just as we were starting to go home (we were looking at the. last field we planned to check) we spotted five curlew in a field. Four of tham.were Whimbrel, the fifth was an Eskimo Curlew. After we had observed it for about one minute, it. flew and headed down the island toward San Luis Pass. We had remained in the car-toe entire time and were a good distance jrom the bird. The Whimbrels difi ine'CSSBF'■ With, our binoculars we were able to follow the bird until it either went out of sight or dropped into, a field far down the island (the heat waves made following it with binoculars difficult). We attempted to locate the bird which we had seen in the fields toward which it had flown. In doing so, we met the Stricklings and Hoffmans and informed them of our discovery. After our unsuccessful attempt to locate the bird, we returned to the field where we had first found it. We were studying curlew in.that field when Mrs. Strickling drove up to infonn.ua that they had found an Eskimo Curlew in ai nearby field. We rushed to that field. They had seen the bird there at 4:30 p.m. It was still there when we arrived and observation with -Uie. scope confirmed their identification which.had been made with 7 x 50 binoculars at 300 yards. Mr. & Mrs. J. B. Strickling, Mr. & Mrs. Henry S. Hoffman and our party were able to observe thabird through a 30 power Balscope at 300 yards at leisure. The bird was still feeding in the field at 5:30 p.m. when we left. The following are details on the observation:: Perhaps the best mark and the most striking one was the vary thin short hill. The Whimbrel is a decidedly thick billed bird,, with a thick blunt bill which.usually has as pinkish base to the lower mandible. We estimated the bill length-at one to one and one fourth head lengths. The second most striking mark was the buffiness.. This is especially noticeable on the lower abdomen and crissum. Most Whimbrels have white crissums,. some have ai faint pinkish wash on the crissum, but the Eskimo Curlew had a>distinctly buffy crissum. The pmnin size, approximately the size of a Golden Plover, was also very striking. On April 3, we saw the Eskimo Curlew in comparison with Whimbrel (only at the first field we saw it in), Golden Plover, and ai Long-billed Curlew. It was, of course, much smaller than the Long-billed Curlew. Other marks included the top of the head whichis a uniform brown cap with a thin white indistinct median strips.. The line through the eye was brown and the line above the eye was light buff. The hind neck and upper back were delicately streaked and all the feathers of the back and secondaries of the wings appeared to be edged ttth buffy giving the whole bird a much darker over-all &T appearance than that of'ttie Whimbrel. The Eskimo Curlew stood lower than the Whimbrel and had a different feeding posture which was also lower than that of the Whimbrel. Subsequent Observations: Neither I nor any of the other persons who saw the Eskimo Curlew on April 3rd were able to find it again this spring. However, other persons, searched for the bird and the following-.-observations have been reported to me. April 4 - Armand Yramategui reported an Eskimo Curlew on Galveston. April 6 - Clinton and Linda Snyder reported an Eskimo Curlew on Galveston. April 11 - Mr. O'Hearn reported a "suspicious looking" curlew on Galveston. East spring, the Eskimo Curlew was first reported on March 22 and stayed up until April 26. This spring no reports were received after April 11 despite persistent attempts to find the bird. Perhaps good flying weather in the first half of April induced the bird to migrate on north. EASTER MIGRATION WAVBI BY T. B. FELTNER On Sunday the 17th of April I spent the entire day on Galveston Island cheeking the natural migrant traps. M. steady wind from the south resulted in a very poor count. Throughout the entire Island I found only, three migrant passerines - an Orchard Oriole and a Redstart at LaFitte's Grove and aiRed-eyed Vireo in one of the cedarbreaks on S Road. At approximately 4:30 p.m. I had just started to leave the island when I caught sight of several beautiful thunderheads over West Galveston. Immediately I headed back toward the clouds hoping that the impending rain would bring down some migrants. Between 9- and 10- mile roads I met John Easter & Grant McNiehols and while we stood there discussing the situation at large it began to rain very lightly with a wind shift bringing a fresh breeze from the northwest. Almost immediately birds began to literally materialize in the sky over our heads.