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The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960 - Image 2. May 1960. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1955/show/1940.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1960). The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1955/show/1940

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960 - Image 2, May 1960, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1955/show/1940.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 9, No. 1, May 1960
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. IX, No. 1, May 1960
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Emanuel, Victor L.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date May 1960
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 13
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9845
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f013_005_002.jpg
Transcript pages 2 EIRST HOUSTON SPRING CENSUS7: April 24, I960 compiled by Victor E. Emanuel This years spring census was an experiment. For the past 7 years, the O.G. group has held ax Spring Roundup. The area was roughly limited to a section of Texas extending 200 miles along the Coast from. Port Aransas and Rockport to High Island and inland. about 80 miles to Hockley in Nffi Harris County. This tremendous area was "covered" by about 50 people in 10 parties with the largest number of observers and parties in the Houston- Galveston area* Only species were counted, not individuals. The object was to see how many species could be seen in one day, but there was no basis for competition with other groups in the country since there was no definite limitation of area. Also there was very little scientific value in such a. count since (1)) only species were counted, not individuals, (2) the huge areaaoould not be covered well at all and thus the results: were more a function of where the various parties went in a particular year rather than a function of what species were present in tie whole area. This year it was. decided to conduct a spring census in oar Ghristmas Count circle. This type of count has the advantage of being limited to a definite area, which is desirable from both the competitive aad scientific standpoint, and of being in small enough area so that the. area-can be covered fairly well. Most important of all, individuals as well as apattfap were counted. Tennessee Warbler - 125 is much more meaningful aad useful in defining the status of this warbler in our area and in judging the teimpo of spring migration in a given year than just Tennessee Warbler. Also, by holding the spring census in our Christmas count area we are able to gain knowledge about the fluctuations in resident speeies andihe numbers of wintering birds which linger. The latter information is very useful in determining whether the season is early, average, or late. The ssults of this years spring census are given on the following pages. Total number of species seem 197. Total number of individuals seen: 19,100. Six hundred and seventy five warblers representing twenty-nine species were identified. One party (party 6), mentioned 200 unidentified warblers. Other parties undoubtedly had unidentified warblers also', but these were not noted. In'Hhe future, it would be a good idee* for all parties to note unidentified warblers "to give a better idea, of the volume of the warbler migration. This years spring census was an excellent success in many respects. The total of species is a very good one for a 15-mile diameter circle and should rank high among spring censuses throughout the nation. Many parties found large numbers of migrants, but some areas found few migrants and generally the pattern was one of pockets of migrants. Light thunderstorms during the day and an overcast sky all day were evidently responsible for the large numbers- of migrants observed. Eb is also possible that -the birds were anticipating the cdoI front which swept into central Texas on Sunday, but was very weak when it hit the Houston area Monday. More important, the census results furnish valuable data which will enable us to gauge the flow of spring migration and the departure of winterrosidents. The census figures show example after example to demonstrate the lateness of land bird migration this spring. Also, the totals for the individual species are useful in defining tfee status of several species in the area, particularly warblers. T will have more to say about this in an article in the next "Spoonbill"' summing up the spring season. Our spring census will be published in the TOS' newsletter along with censuses from other parts of the state. It is to be hoped that other areas, especially coastal areas, will conduct spring censuses in the years to come. This will enable ,us to learn much more about the pattern of Texas migration. Several localities in other parts of the country such as, New Jersey held spring censuses this spring. Bl a; later issue of the "Spoonbill" I hope to report their totals for comparison with ours. THE RESULTS 3SDTAL SEECIES: 197 within 15 mile diameter circle (Roek Dove excluded)) TOTAL INDIVIDUALS: 19,100 AHEA:-, Same as for Houston Christinas Count, 15 mile diameter circle with center just north of Baytown including parts of San Jacinto Monument, Highlands, Button Lake, Mont Belvieu and La. Porte at its limits.