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The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934
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The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934 - Image 3. Spring 1934. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 2, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1909/show/1907.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Spring 1934). The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1909/show/1907

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934 - Image 3, Spring 1934, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 2, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1909/show/1907.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Spring 1934
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9625
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_004_003.jpg
Transcript Spring, 1934 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Page 3 A Wasp Called The Mud-Dauber ^|_Rn • (Continued from page 1) etaphysical abstraction, devoid of the guile and the caprices of life, doing her full duty, without fear or favor of man, trusting Him only who has guided your destiny. When we realize that the head of a wasp is smaller than the button head by which mighty man fastens his collar, and with this speck of a head she must time her operations with the seasons; that she must not blunder except at the cost of her life; that she must not tarry except at the peril of her offspring—we are amazed in contemplating her powers of perception and finesse. If she is capable of the intense concentration necessary to the accomplishment of these things, and more, she has facility with this same small head to avoid the devastating mental diffusion that inflict man and cause him sooner or later to impair his fortune. We are intrigued with the negative I characteristics of the wasp as we are enthused with her positive virtues. Her faculties of restraint seem no less potent than do her powers to achieve. No fantastic diversions dissipate her energies. She suffers no atrophy of personality through the deceptive conventions of society. She invites no jeopardy of posterity through the negating complexes of her sex. She is free from the blight of mere dogmas and creeds, free from the stupidities of man that decree his limitations. Signs of Life Appear Now the once cold and inanimate house that had contained only tiny eggs and embalmed spiders began to show signs of life. In about two months the first occupant was released from its prison cell to go out into the world to perform its duty, as had the other countless progenitors of its kind. The other eggs were soon to evolve nto white grubs. The grubs would then egin to feed on the spiders and grow fat in hastening to their chrysalis home, where they would mould a wax coffin around themselves to undergo their miraculous change. Two days later, cell number two had become the old homestead. Its occupant had gone. Some days afterwards, cell number three, likewise, had become an empty tomb with the stone rolled away. It was here I began to tamper with life's forces and to explore the cells of the remaining seven rooms, investigating the various forms of life and the different stages of growth of the grub, from one to several days ahead of what would have been their natural birth. These narrow confines disclosed the subtle processes evolved and bore mute evidences of life in the making. Some Curious Observations It was noticed that the three young wasps had made their exit from the same side of their home. As far as I could see, there was no good reason why one end served this purpose any better than the other. In examining the partially developed young wasps, I observed that their heads were without exception pointed in the same direction. Did Mother Wasp leave printed directions in the cell ? If so, how did these grubs know how to read signs so young, and in the dark, too? The open ends were also toward the east. I wonder if this is significant? The pale, almost colorless, lump of matter that hatches from the egg and is called larvae rapidly assumes shape and advances to the pupal stage as a full- grown grub. One definite end of life's progress is now attained. The grub has builded into itself from the body of the spider all the life elements necessary to a full-grown wasp. It has now finished feeding and goes into its cellophane home called the chrysalis, where one of the most miraculous changes in all insect life takes place. Here in this quiet abode its body substances change into organisms and assemble themselves into the finished parts. Within a few days the skeleton outlines of a young wasp can be recognized. The buds of antennas, wings, legs and other body appurtenances now begin to sprout and grow, something after the plan of leaves and flowers growing upon their stems. These small dot and streak outlines assume patterns and put on colors as growth continues and as the body expands to permanent form. Watch Nature's Expansion I watched with minute care these expanding transformations from the egg to the mature insect and the evolvement of a wondrous head. I have tried to comprehend the subtle process in the manufacture of finished tools and instruments, that were adequate to their needs. I have been charmed with the fashioning of scintillating eyes of many facets. I have thrilled to see matter grow into lives sufficiently vital to cause the being to love, and to sing, and to mate, to define their life's purpose, to make decisions, to arrive at their goal, progressing in logical order to the end that was decreed for them in the beginning. In these processes I have sensed things not found in entomological literature. I have mistaken at times the solitude of hibernation for the folds of death, only to find in the plan an enfoldment of a new and brighter life in transition. Thus passed the days with my winsome visitor, from her song time of life to its close. I saw her children undergo change from the egg to the end of their life's cycle. It has been a pleasant and profitable journey. Many interesting things have happened along the way. Still the Mystery Remains The primary causes that were hidden then are not apparent now. The road to their discovery seems as long and as endless as the road pointing backward to their origin, the manifestations of the law only serving to make us aware of the profound mystery surrounding it all. Man strives in vain to lift the somber veil of the past. We long to look through the morning mists which cloud in obscurity the beginning. We realize, however, that it is better so; that these things are too fundamental, perhaps, to trust to the false and defective reasonings of man; that they are too brilliant, maybe, to risk with the corroding elements of time. Little wasp, called the mud-dauber, we are glad you came this way. You have added vitally to things seen but not understood. You have inspired sentiment to things sensed but not seen. "El Jardin: Birds Sing in Texas," by R. A. Selle, is the newest bird book, and it is the first in its class for a section of the United States which is newer, and therefore less heralded in literature, than most sections. A compilation from articles that have been published during a period of twenty years in the Houston Chronicle, the San Antonio Light and the Corpus Christi Caller, this book contains valuable notes on bird life. Yet it is readable. In a popular style, "Blue Birds and Bluebonnets," "The Blackbirds' Carnival," "The Pageant of Wild Ducks" and "The Texas Roadrunner" suggest interesting chapters in the experience of a naturalist rambling in the big woods and along the thick-grown bayous. Bound in "redbird red," it is an attractive gift volume. Price, $1.50. Pillot's Book Store.