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The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934
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The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934 - Image 2. Spring 1934. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 2, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1909/show/1906.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Spring 1934). The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1909/show/1906

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934 - Image 2, Spring 1934, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 2, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1909/show/1906.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Spring 1934
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9625
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_004_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OP HOUSTON, TEXAS Spring, 1934 THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OF HOUSTON, TEXAS Organized, 1923 Affiliated with National Association of Audubon Societies Associated Outdoor Clubs of America OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB OFFICERS FOB 1934 R. A. SELLE — President C. H. KIEFNER. First Vice-President DR. A. J. JAMES.....—™...Second Vice-President J. M. HEISER, JR Corresponding Secretary MRS. ADELE HARRISON.-Recording Secretary MRS. EDNA MINER Treasurer MRS. LOUISE KAISER Custodian ROBERT VINES Auditor MISS MABEL CASSELL Parliamentarian L. H. DAINGERFIELD..Honorary Vice-President BOARD OF DIRECTORS Alston Clapp, Sr. Rex D. Frazier Bud A. Randolph Dr. Kenneth Hartley J. "W. Stiles Arthur Lefevre, Jr. Anyone interested in the objects of the Club may become ' a member upon presentation of signed application card, endorsed by two members and accompanied by membership fee for the current calendar year. MEMBERSHIP FEES Annual Member $ 1.00 Associate Member 5.00 Life Member 50.00 Correspondence regarding this bulletin may be addressed to J. M. HEISER, JR. 1724 Kipling Street Houston, Texas Regular meetings of the Club are held on the first and third Thursdays of the month at 8 p.m. The first meeting is principally for business, committee reports and talking over plans, but there is usually a display of specimens, photographs and informal discussions of nature topics; sometimes these meetings are held at the homes of members. The open meeting, third Thursday, is held in the Public Library, and it is the occasion for an educational lecture, an exhibition of nature films, or some other formal feature intended to interest the general public. General Club outings are open to all members and to visitors who are willing to follow the few simple rules observed by all similar clubs. Arrangements depend upon such factors as available transportation, seasonal attractions at accessible points, and the wishes of Club members as developed at meetings. Special field trips are planned by groups engaged in research and conservation work, and the results of these expeditions are noted in the Club's records and given due publicity. OBJECTS OF THE CLUB To make stronger the bond of friendly understanding that exists among all lovers of Nature. To study our local flora and fauna and work for the preservation of all useful and interesting forms. To co-operate with other societies throughout the land in the work of conservation and observation. lo encourage Nature study, tree planting, and appreciation and protection of wild life among children and adults. To encourage hiking and interest in the outdoors as a source of health and inspiration. COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN Outing and Publicity J. M. Heiser, Jr.; H-8654 Conservation....Alston Clapp, Sr.; H-3912 Art Miss Tillie Schmidt; H-6915 Program Miss M. Fitzgerald; L-5929 Membership-.Miss Erna Giesecke; V-21188 Notification..Mrs. Ada S. Reeves; W-3535 Parliamentarian Miss Mabel Cassell Spring Rhapsody (Continued from page 1) amidst and flirting with far-away forest foliage. This world of ours would be a dreary place indeed without flowers. They are bits of the stars that shine on earth and bring us a little closer to heaven. To cultivate them should be a joy forever; to live with them is to walk with fairies and angels. Some poet has said they are God's thoughts of beauty taking form to gladden mortal's gaze. Some of the so-called commonest flowers have been in cultivation as far back as man can trace—notably the rose and the pink. Give me the lowly daisy, the common pink, the morning glory that twines on the poor man's cottage; the wild honeysuckle that sheds its fragrance for all to enjoy; the sunflower that rises to glowing heights amidst trash piles; the wood violet which we trample under our feet; those snow-white clusters of our Southland called dogwood blossoms, the wild plum, creeping Charlies, sweet bluebells and the little desert lilies. Soon all nature will be a riot of color around Houston. The earth will be carpeted with green; the trees will be budding and nodding with joy; birds will be singing joyous carols of praise; butterflies just out of the chrysalis stage will be flying amidst the flowers and shrubs, adding tints of every hue. Tangled moss on treetops will seem to come to life. Diamond dewdrops will mingle with the golden tints of the morning sun; pearls will burst frorn little emerald buds; silvery sprays will twine the forest. A carpet of glowing beauty will be at your feet, and flaky, fleecy, foamy clouds will float above you—for spring will soon be with us. The miracle of the reborn world of nature is nearing. The ordinary mortal cannot explain a flower. To analyze what causes their beauty is like trying to dissect music. I love both. I care not what causes them to lift me upward. Too much explaining and probing is often more harmful than helpful. Enjoy the things of this earth that are beautiful and sacred, and ask not why. Be thankful that you have them. Leave it to the scientists to explain the color and the petals of a rose. —The Houston Press, 1929. The gracious, adaptable and fast- growing sycamore is too American to be kept out of any plan for planting trees. I Dine With The Celebrities (Continued from page 1) * then whirled, and the goats went up the side of the wall; but Mr. Skunk did not even look in their direction; he continued down to the edge of the water, where two more goats were standing. But they moved away, and the arrogant black rascal was rather deliberate in getting a drink. "Yes," says M. E. Tracy, "I know men like that. Skunk-men, with a bent for a nuisance threat; they demand the roads and highways; they are the first at the pools." Blackbirds' Carnival "And the clattering surge of blackbirds rolls through the trees like a gale." Among the first obvious signs of spring, the swarming of the blackbirds takes first place. Before the arrival of the smaller birds, the raucous charivari of^ these comedians breaks out like a car-" nival of feathered frivolity. To the bird world this boisterous frolic must in some way compare to the commotion caused by an organ grinder and his red-vested monkey in a populous section of the city. There may be arguments, prolonged and animated, as to when the bluebirds or the robins arrive, and there is some justification for the argument as to who saw the first robin or the first bluebird; but every one knows the exact time when the blackbirds arrived. Just before the deciduous trees put out their new leaves, the blackbirds swarm the landscape; they come into the city with a rush as of winds; they are so numerous and so animated and so recklessly aggressive that other birds, pigeons and even the competent alley cats, must seek safety in flight. CULL tv^cJb^JC^J^ ~x- 3&<-4 d^Mctiy^ As conservation chairman of the Federated Women's Clubs, Mrs. Herbert Rob-1 erts is carrying the message of conser-" vation into the public schools. Conferring with teachers, meeting with club groups and study organizations, addressing parent-teacher association meetings and making general assembly talks, Mrs. Roberts is really getting across with the idea that roadside wild flowers can be enjoyed without being picked and that Christmas greenery should not be gathered where it belongs to the landscape. AMl