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The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 12, December 1992
Image 4
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 12, December 1992 - Image 4. December 1992. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/189/show/182.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1992). The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 12, December 1992 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/189/show/182

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 12, December 1992 - Image 4, December 1992, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/189/show/182.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 41, No. 12, December 1992
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XLI, No. 12, December 1992
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date December 1992
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 11
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9877
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f011_012_004.jpg
Transcript I love my creature comforts, and yet on a recent Monterey pelagic trip, there I stood, up forward, facing a cold wind and a driving fine rain. Feeling seasick, cold and wet...I was NOT happy. ...I swore I would never again set foot on a boat. Almost immediately, a black blob appeared 150 yards from the boat and someone called, "Get that bird!" ...bobbing up and down before us was a Tufted Puffin. A life bird and my 400th state bird! Suddenly, I was wildly happy. I didn't want to be anywhere else in the world, right at that moment. Try to explain that to a nonbirder and you'll get a sideways look. [The Western Tanager. Los Angeles Audubon Society] ARTICLES IS THERE A DIAL TONE? by Pat Marks Everyone gets phone calls. Some are more memorable than others. Pat Marks, naturalist at the Houston Arboretum & Nature Center, says that the following "was the best phone conversation I've had in my entire life," and has offered to take a Ue detector test to document that she did not exaggerate her account in the slightest. Caller Hello, can you help me identify these birds I see in my backyard? Pat: I can try. Caller Well, I live off of Memorial [Drive]... and these birds come to my backyard every afternoon around four o'clock. They fly in flocks of 25 to a dozen and they look just like a duck except they don't have a duck's bill. They are bright beige and have spots on their backs. I used my binoculars to look at them and then I paged through the bird book and they look exactly like a flicker, but my husband said they aren't woodpeckers. Pat, using the Socratic method: Do they feed on the ground? Caller: Yes, they're all over the ground. Pat What color are their legs? Caller Their legs are not long and we don't get our lawn mowed until Friday! Pat, gamely forging ahead anyway: WeQ, it sounds like they could be Mourning Doves. Caller No, they aren't doves because they aren't gray. They are bright beige! Pat Some of the doves in this area are beige with spots. Can you see the way that they move? Doves move their head forward and then the body follows. Caller: I can't see them — it's not four o'clock, yet. But they might move like that. Just look out your window at four. Pat, continuing on just for the pure joy of it: What size are these birds? Caller I don't know, I don't have any way to measure them. Pat Compared to the size of a Blue Jay for instance Caller Well, they are as big as a Blue Jay-if a Blue Jay were smaller. Pat Gosh, these birds sound very interesting. Please give me a call when you find out what they are! Caller Oh, I will. They really do look just like a duck. BOLIVAR FLATS - NOVEMBER 18, 1992 by Gail Diane Luckner A blustery day threatening rain, and a high tide, along with a fine assortment of shorebirds, greeted 13 intrepid birders at Bolivar Flats on thk Wednesday morning OG field trip. A single, obliging Red Knot made an appearance early in the trip and allowed leaders Gail Luckner and Winnie Burkett to compare size, shape and bill with nearby Black-bellied Plovers, Western Sandpipers, Dunlins and Sanderlings. Several novice birders in the group had their first looks at Marbled Godwit, Ruddy Turnstone and Long- billed Curlew and were treated to the beauty and wonder of over 3000 American Avocets. And Al Clarke got his target bird for the day-American Oystercatcher. While six tern species stood side-by-side, birders tried to differentiate Common from Forster's and Caspian from Royal. Hundreds of Black Skimmers lined up for inspection, and a few of them exhibited their "skimming" behavior at close range. After learning adult and immature Brown Pelican plumages, Barbara Horvitz accepted the challenge of counting numbers of each as she picked them out from among the large flock of American White Pelicans. Many of the birders also identified their first Black- shouldered Kites when two of these stunning birds sailed overhead. As we headed for the marsh, Burkett explained the dynamics of the flats and how they are actually "man-made- created" by sediment deposits channeled from the jetties. In front of us, a female Merlin straffed the salt pans, scaring up hundreds of Western Sandpipers and Dunlins, and Savannah Sparrows popped up all around us. In all, the OG birders identified 48 species, and the several newcomers to the area put Bolivar Flats at the top of their list for great places to see birds.