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The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 9, January 1965
Image 2
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 9, January 1965 - Image 2. January 1965. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1880/show/1875.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1965). The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 9, January 1965 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1880/show/1875

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 9, January 1965 - Image 2, January 1965, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1880/show/1875.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 13, No. 9, January 1965
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XIII, No. 9, January 1965
Contributor (Local)
  • Ellis, Pat
  • Ellis, Jim
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1965
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 27
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9850
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f027_001_002.jpg
Transcript NESTING BROWN PELICANS Charlotte Johnson On the boat, The Whooping Crane, out of Sea-Gun Marina, I met Reagan Lee, warden for the National Audubon Society at Aransas Wildlife Refuge. He said that in 1963, 12 mature Brown Pelicans appeared on 2nd Chain Islands. 6 fledged. In 1964, 20 adults nested on 2nd Chain Islands and 35 eggs hatched and all 35 fledged. He feels that in a few years we may have a large colony of the Brown Pelicans nesting on 2nd Chain Islands. They start laying about March 16th and leave in August. PRAIRIE CHICKEN DEADLINE NEAR February 18 is the deadline for the World Wildlife Fund to exercise its option to purchase 3,400 acres of grassland near Eagle Lake for a Prairie Chicken refuge. This tract of land is ideal Prairie Chicken habitat and there is some resident breeding stock already present. It is not unlikely that failure to preserve this piece of land in perpetuity and in its wild state may result in the extinction of this race of the Greater Prairie Chicken. The price of the land, $365,000, is approximately one-half of the present market value of the land. If this option is allowed to lapse, acquisition of any suitable area in the future, if even possible, must certainly be much more expensive. The corporate structure of the World Wildlife Fund has been designed to insure that lands acquired by the Fund will remain as refuges in perpetuity. If you have not yet made a donation to the Prairie Chicken Fund, or if you can make another donation, send your contribution ttrr Texas Prairie Chicken Committee World Wildlife Fund P.O. Box 52341 Houston, Texas Donations are tax deductible EARLY CHRISTMAS COUNT RETURNS Cocoa, Fla. has done it again with an all time high of 204 species. Houston dropped from 193 last year to 165 when fog cut two hours off field time. After a preliminary report of 181 species from Freeport, a late report from Vic Emanuel gives an official Freeport total of 183, second highest count ever in Texas. WHOOPERS UP Forty-two Whooping Cranes, an increase of ten individuals over last year have arrived at the Aransas Wildlife Refuge. There were ten youngsters among the cranes. The same number were counted this last summer by Canadians at the breeding grounds, indicating that all of the Whooping Cranes in the whole wide world made a safe trip from Canada to Texas. MANGROVE CUCKOO IN GALVESTON Jim Ellis The following is the text of an account written for submission with the Galveston Christmas Count report. "On Wednesday, Cecember 30, 1964, my wife, Pat, and I observed a Mangrove Cuckoo (Coccyzus minor) in the city of Galveston, Texas. The bird was first discovered by Pat in a large live oak tree at the front of the Menard house at the corner of 33rd and N§- Streets. When she first saw the bird it was partially hidden in the foliage, with only the tail clearly visible. She called to me that she had found a cuckoo. As I approached, the bird moved into the open. The buff underparts struck us immediately. As the bird moved from limb to limb we were able to see that there was no rufous in the wings. "We knew that there is a third species of cuckoo which occurs in the United States other than the Yellow-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) and the Black-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus erythropthalmus) with which we are familiar. We knew that the bird occurred in Florida but we did not know any of the distinguishing field marks. Unfortunately, we had with us only one field guide, "Field Guide to the Birds of Texas" by Peterson. This book of course does not contain this bird. Pat stayed with the bird while I went to the