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The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958
Image 15
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The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958 - Image 15. January 1958. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/18/show/14.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1958). The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958 - Image 15. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/18/show/14

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958 - Image 15, January 1958, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/18/show/14.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958
Contributor (Local)
  • Aiken, Carl H., III
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1958
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 9
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9843
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 15
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f009_001_015.jpg
Transcript Page 8 The prime need of the condor is protection from disturbance by man. It Is remarkable that the species has persisted so long close to cities and within a region of extensive oil production. To adequately protect the condor It Is necessary that the state law under which It is given legal protection, as one of the many non-game birds of California, be strictly enforced. State game authorities can grant permits to take condors, and they have done so within the past few years although no birds were actually taken. To prevent further molestation all conservation organizations should urge the tightening of the enforcement of this law by the California Department of Fish and Game. A wildlife sanctuary, established by the U.S. Forest Service within the Los Padres National Forest, includes most of the condor nesting'sites and the principal winter roosts. But condors range widely, feed principally on private lands, and roosts in several areas that are protected only by the ruggedness of the country. These widespread feeding and roosting areas are subject to Increasing disturbance since It is not practical to include more land within sanctuaries. Protection can best be achieved through the constant cooperation of government agencies and the education of ranchers, hunters, campers and others who visit the condor's range. Both individuals and organizations can aid in this long-term educational program. In addition, by securing the interest and active cooperation of stockmen the supply of condor food can be maintained. At appropriate times and sites, ranchers can leave carcasses undisturbed for the birds. A continuing effort must be made to guard against changing methods of predator and rodent control that might permit condors to eat a lethal,dose of poisoned meat or to be harmed by traps. To adequately protect the condor, the services of a trained field man and a local conservation group are required. Together, they could keep track of the status of the remaining birds, inform people of the continuing need for their protection, and alert conservation agencies and organizations to future threats of their welfare. The hiring and equipping of a well- qualified man for this job would be costly, and for this reason the support of large conservation organizations is necessary. One way or another, the fate of the condor rests with the people of this country. If they fail to recognize the precarious situation of this bird, it will most likely fade to oblivion. On the other hand, if. they unite in an effort to protect condors from molestation and to preserve their habitat, a healthy population can be maintained for enjoyment and study by future generationso Let us see to it that the latter course Is taken. November 1957 Report from Mr. Arlie K, McKay - Gove Area Common LoorT7~2* en 10th and 1 6n™TSthlT*Hr'Qwn Pelican,, 1 on 23rd .(first since April 24); Anhinga, 3 on the 25th and 7 on the 30th, Green Heron, 1 on the 14th and 30th (first Nov, records)5 American Bittern, 2.on the 12thj White-faced Ibis, 1 on the 19th and another on the IQ.th; Spoonbill, 9 '.on the 12th; Whlte-fr. Goose, 22 on the 2nd and 37 on the 9th (several flocks); Canada Goose, only one flock on the 17th; Mallard, 500/ on the 26th; Black Duck* 1 killed on the 17th; Mottled Duok, 1 to 17 frequently; Gadwall, 30 on the 23rd; Baldpate, 8000/ on the 26th; Pintail, 200000 on the 18th? Green- winged Teal, 150000 on the 12th; Blue-winged Teal, common in the first part of the month, I have never known them to be present In Nov, except as stragglers; Wood Duck, 1 on the 23rd; Redhead, 31/ on the 2nd, 10/ on the 18th, 1 on the 23rd, and 1 on the 30th; Canvasback, 150 on the 9th; Lesser Scaup, 300/ on the 9th; RIng-neeked Duok, 60/ on the 2nd, 40/ on the 18th,'.and the last on the 23rd; Common Goldeneye, 1 on the 18th and 2 on the 29th; Ruddy Duek, 5 on the 2nd; Red-br. Merganser, 2 on the 9th, 5 on the 10th, ■! on the 18th, and 1 on the 29th; Red-tailed Hawk, 53 on the 30th; Swainson's Hawk, 2 (both dark phase) seen until the 23rd? Bald Eagle, ,1 on the 28th; Marsh Hawk, 21 on the 30th; Sparrow Hawk, 35 on the 30th; Clapper Rail, 2 on the 10th and 1 on the 18th; Ringed Plover, 3 on the 9th and 1 on the 23rd; Blaek- bellied Plover, 30/ on the 10th; Ruddy Turnstone, 3 on the 9th and 23rd; Snipe, 5 on the 11th; Long-billed Curlew, 1 on the 8th; Spotted Sandpiper, 1 on the 23rd; Willet, 1 to 10 frequently; Greater Yellowlegs, 30/ on the 10th; Lesser Yellowlegs, 5 on the 10th and 12/ on the 12th; Short-billed Dowiteher, 18 on the 29th; Avooet, 1 on the 26th; Franklin's Gull, 100/ on the 10th and the last one on the 23rd; Bonaparte's Gull, 2 on the 10th and 1 on the 26th and 30th; Black Skimmer, 4 on the 26; Ground Dove, 1 on the 29th; GROOVE- BILLED ANI, 1 on the 13th and 2 on the 17th; Barred Owl, 1 on the BBtE;— HarryTfooSpeoker, 1 on the 28th; Downy Woodpeeker, 7' on the 28th; Say's Phoebe, 1 on the 2nd; Vermilion Flycatcher, frequent, not less than 13"this fall; Tree Swallow, migrating until end of month; Rough-winged Swallow, 2 on