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The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958
Image 13
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The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958 - Image 13. January 1958. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/18/show/12.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1958). The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958 - Image 13. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/18/show/12

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958 - Image 13, January 1958, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/18/show/12.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958
Contributor (Local)
  • Aiken, Carl H., III
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1958
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 9
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9843
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 13
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f009_001_013.jpg
Transcript Page 7 THE CALIFORNIA CONDOR - From *'0ur Endangered Wa Federation. ICari B. Koford) t, publics Lon of the National Wildlife The California Condi pounds and has a wingspaJ huge Turkey Vulture,■ altj great steadiness, its wl: plumage of the condor Is of the under surface of head is naked and bright sooty In color untll: %&'A Fossil remains ind'i Condors ranged eastward from Lower California, 2 Columbia River. But eve restricted. Condors are California after 1835. range continued to shrid change, For the most parjijAft miles long which covers San Joaquin Valley of CaJ common as they were SO'-'x formerly. The shrinkage of th changes in its food supp of a dozen miles or more consists principally of fre on the open range. In the herbivores were common, eo century the condor sometlm animals washed up by the se as Spanish missions were ea sheep were introduced Into t provided abundant food„ Grs ranches in the later ISOO-'s. aparently came to depend upo At present the priaclpa sheep ranches that remain ill been toward a constantly din livestock in many areas„ Ha cared for than In the eld^jdJi of cattle at a time. oar das burned or buried. The fosjjd,'. it seems to be adequate i rr- An intensive effort^lM few decades. Present aoll'eo of which are eggshells„ Dot] by collectors. Some have- aJ ranchers. It Is probable ts extent, for reducing the pot range. None has been taken] Within recent years mas at their roosts or nest5 by] graphing. Even a seemingly roosting birds, the breaking chick. It is estimated that ft constant since about- 1920. left. Their breeding poteh-fl is too young to breed. The. because the single young Is Is about a year old, a pair year. And although an averi accidents can befall the egg age of independence each yea average annual mortality wei the number of condors would of a few birds could start .t population. largest soaring land bird, weighs about 20 'set. In general appearance, it resembles a tmpar*d to that bird the condor soars with Msely elevated-and its tail widespread. The pblack, but in the admit the leading third L'from, armpit to wrist, is pure white. The in color. The immature condor is entirely j&W^'-jjtmTa old. Lt many thousands of years ago California Plreaf In historical times they were known p. south of the border, northward to the than a century ago the range was becoming finitely recorded for localities north of they ware rar-s in northern California. The about liJt^iv.Since then there has been little be now confined to a U-shaped region 100 fceaias and foothills surrounding the southern ii^jvln part3 of this region they are as »fein a few areas they are more common than H s range before 1880 was probably due to is great bird is adapted to soaring distances ps home roost in search of food which sh'oarcasses of large grazing animals that die Pleistocene period, when large carnivores and 'food was abundant. Early in the last p. on the carcasses of whales and other as the South American condor does today. Then, tablished In California, thousands of cattle and heart of the condor range. This livestock aerds were maintained by the land grant p was during these times that the condor pmestic livestock for food. BURce- of. food is the few large cattle and pi condor- range. The trend, however, has shed food supply. Crops have replaced ps have become smaller. Stock is better .disease and drought no longer kill thousands fffipiii&fptmtt on the range but are generally ply will continue to decrease, but as yet imal1 number of ; condors. fie to collect condor skins and eggs for a as contain about 200 specimens, one third pss many other condors were mortally wounded been shot wantonly by uninformed hunters or these losses were responsible, to a large gi'oa to the oresent low number and restricted b legal sanction since 1923. pHi-meaning people have disturbed condors p-r sorting them for observation or photo- a -alarm can indirectly cause the injury of an sgg„ or the starvation of a dependent ppixlatloii of condors has been fairly pe are .now"approximately 60 of these birds Is lowand about a third of the population lining birds may form 20 nesting pairs, but pndent upon its parents for food until it raise no more than one young every other pf tsn pairs may nest In any one year, many young. Perhaps about five young reach the And it can be readily seen that if the feh over five percent of the population, bdls toward extinction. Any unusual loss East downward trend of this remnant