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The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958
Image 11
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The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958 - Image 11. January 1958. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/18/show/10.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1958). The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958 - Image 11. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/18/show/10

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958 - Image 11, January 1958, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/18/show/10.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol, 6, No. 9, January 1958
Contributor (Local)
  • Aiken, Carl H., III
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1958
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 9, Folder 9
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9843
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b009_f009_001_011.jpg
Transcript Page 6 Cattle Egret ' ~fEe~H¥est observation of Cattle Egrets in this area occurred on December 22, 1957 when four individuals were seen near the Intersection of S Road and 8-mile Read on Galveston Island. These birds, about the size of Snowy Egrets, had heavy yellow bills and much thicker necks and heads than Snowies, They were in winter plumage of solid white without buffy coloring on head, breast, or back. When first observed they were~cTose to the highway feeding on insects in the grass and never getting more than a foot or two from the grazing cattle. When approached, they flew, but later In the afternoon they were observed in the same pasture by Louise and Henry Hoffman, Ruth Moorman, Leota Stilwell, Jerry Baker, and Norma Oates. On December 28, 1957 several of the above observers returned to Galveston and found three Cattle Egrets feeding with cattle near 9-mile Road, and later in the day, two individuals were observed in the same pasture as those located on the 22nd„ These two egrets were observed for thirty minutes or more and were photographed as they moved about in the pasture feeding near the grazing cattle. Groove-billed Anl Mr. and SrsT Chas. W. Hamilton saw three Groove-billed Anis on Oet. 14, 1956, along the roadside near the end of S Road on Galveston Island. Almost a year later, on Oet. 13, 1957, at the same spot on Galveston Island, Steve Williams, Vic Emanuel, and Carl Aiken, found a Groove-billed Anl in low brush about 20 feet from where they parked their car on S Road (near 13-mile Road). They studied the bird carefully and listened to its call. Arlie K. McKay, in the Cove area, reported that D.D, Dutton saw a Groove-billed Anl on Oct, 4 or 5, 1957. On December 15, 1957, five anis were again seen by Mr. and Mrs, Chas. W. Hamilton In the salt cedars and other low shrubs across the road from the Galveston Country Club, near the end of S Road. The birds were observed as they perched on the fenee and in the bushes, and as they flew across the road, Mr, and Mrs. Hamilton also listened to the low call of the anis. A week later, on December 22, 1957, in the same location on Galveston Island, six anis were seen by Leota Stilwell, Ruth Moorman, Jerry Baker, Norma Oates, and Louise and Henry Hoffman. The birds were observed for thirty minutes or more as they perched on the fenee and moved about in the thick brush from fifteen to thirty feet away. All Identifying marks could plainly be seen including the thick grooved bill, long tail, black plumage, etc. The most recent observation of this species In this area occurred on December 29, 1957, during the official Christmas Count, when two Individuals were seen in Baytown, Texas, by Leota Stilwell, Carrie Holeomb, Nance Cunningham, Josiephine Wilkin, and Margaret Stilwell. These two anis were seen by all members of the party, in good light, and were carefully identified. Peregrine Falcon - (Mr. H. P. McElroy) On November 30, (see December "Spoonbill") John O'Neill and I were birding on Sergeant Beach when we drove past a Peregrine Falcon sitting on a log just behind the water line. Not wanting to frighten the bird by a sudden stop we continued down the beach for approximately 50 yards. At this distance he showed no nervousness and continued to sit on the log with feathers slightly ruffled. After about five minutes he began to show signs of restlessness, wagged his tail, turned around on his perch, and with - feathers smoothed down he fixed a formatible stare on some distant object to the east. After bobbing his head he flew off In a north-western direction gaining altitude rapidly. His movement was strong and rapid, yet it gave an almost liquid impression of grace. He continued in this direction for half a mile then made a sharp turn and headed towards us again. We then noticed a group of seven to ten Starlings approaching from the east, directly towards the falcon. With half closed wings the Peregrine made a long stoop at the flock, causing one to veer off to the right--this was the one he persued. The hawk made a number of shallower stoops In which he usually changed directions two or three times. From our distance it appeared that he made a hit each time, but such was not the case because after five or six of these efforts the lucky Starling put in at a tree stump. The hawk made a wide circle, picked up speed and passed over the stump at a blazing pace, but didn't return. Shortly thereafter we lost sight of him. *************** *****