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The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 6, October 1969
Image 3
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 6, October 1969 - Image 3. October 1969. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1677/show/1671.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 1969). The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 6, October 1969 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1677/show/1671

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 6, October 1969 - Image 3, October 1969, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1677/show/1671.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 18, No. 6, October 1969
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVIII, No. 6, October 1969
Contributor (Local)
  • Lefkovits, David
  • Lefkovits, Dorothy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date October 1969
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 4
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9854
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f004_010_003.jpg
Transcript Page 3. BENTSEN-RIO GRANDE TO GET FACILITIES taken from Texas Parks _ Wildlife Notes A $302,900 contract has been awarded to Wilson Construction Company for the construction of new facilities at Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park. The project will include a new headquarters building, a service building, two restrooms with showers, a restroom renovation, a park residence, 78 trailer sites, and 15 picnic units, Bentsen-Rio Grande State Park is a 588-acre park located approximately three miles southwest of Mission in Hildalgo County. It is a favorite spot for birdwatchers, and many rare species of birds are found there including Lichenstein's Oriole, Hooded Oriole, gray hawk, pauraque, groove-billed ani, longbilled thrasher, green jay, kiskadee flycatcher, and red-eyed cowbird. The project should be completed in July, 1970. It was reported in another issue that nature trails would be established so that visitors would be able to learn of the interrelationship between the unusual plants and the tremendous variety of birds. Two trails are going to be connected and a guide book prepared. A NOTE FROM OLD FRIENDS! Hi! Greetings from Albuquerque! We miss our OG friends considerably: now that it's fall migration time the urge is rising, but jobs interfere. However, we do fairly well on week-ends - have added 9 or 10 to the life list already. Just finished reading Margaret Millar's "The Birds and Beasts were there." If you haven't read it, you might want to - it's terrific. Has some good words for T.O.S. and mentions the Freeport Count several times. There's no OG here, but a N.M.O.S. that we plan to join in October, very loosely organized, I'm told - monthly publications and semi-annual field notes. Spring bird trip-field. I'll give 'em the Spoonbill-show 'em how to do it! (Incidentally, dues are $4,00 yr. with much less offered than OG), If there's anything good I'll send it along. Best to all, Dan & Marian Washburn. Note from editors: Thank you for remembering us, Dan and Marian! Good luck and let us hear from you soon and often. COASTAL PESTICIDE STUDIES CAUSE ALARM FOR MARINE SPECIES taken from Texas Parks & Wildlife Department News Hotes Seadrift— Concentrations of persistent pesticides from studies conducted by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department cause much concern for some marine species and some bay areas. Beginning in July, 1965, the Department's pesticide study project samples have included oysters, forage fish, game or predator fish, and shore birds and their eggs. So far, monitoring samples have been taken in most of the coastal bay systems with random samples from the Gulf of Mexico, All oyster tissue samples analyzed have averaged considerably less than 1 part per million (ppm) DDT or other pesticides. Forage fish samples analyzed had an average DDT residue ranging from 0.173 ppm to 31275 Ppm. Samples taken in the Lower Laguna Madre have consistently had the highest residues found in Texas Waters. The process of biological magnification increases the level of pesticide concentration in living animals. In an illustration of this process, plankton, one- celled animals and plants, are capable of concentrating pesticide residues found in seawater by at least 10 fold. Fish or oysters feeding on contaminated plankton will increase this level at least another 10 fold, and so on, up the food chain through the predator fish and birds, and eventually to man. Fortunately, in most cases this "concentrated" amount is still much below the level where damage occurs to a species, or where there is danger from consuming one of these species.