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The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 11, November 1993
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 11, November 1993 - Image 4. November 1993. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 25, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/163/show/156.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1993). The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 11, November 1993 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/163/show/156

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 11, November 1993 - Image 4, November 1993, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 25, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/163/show/156.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 11, November 1993
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1993
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 13
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9878
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f013_010_004.jpg
Transcript More Christmas Counts... MON.DEC.27 Galveston, Arch Dillard (713) 996-0107 TUE.DEC.28 Old River, Jonelle Buckles (713) 576-2504 THR.DEC30 Rio Carizal, Gene Blacklock (512) 882-7232 SATJAN.l El Naranjo, Nick Jackson (210) 895-4610 Cypress Creek, Ted Eubanks (713) 666-2669 SUNJAN.2 Spring Creek, John Jones (713) 444-8369 or Calvin Blakely (713) 358-5407 Buffalo Bayou, Bob Honig (713) 665-6963 Beech Creek, David Baker (409) 899-1878 Rio Corona, Gene Blacklock (409) 882-7232 numerous new species for the day. Reddish Egret, Marbled Godwit and American Avocet waded while Green-winged Teal, Gadwall and Mottled Ducks dabbled in the pond around a large concentration of roosting Caspian and Forster's Terns and Laughing Gulls. A Cooper's Hawk passed over, flushing the flock. The bird of the day, however, was a rare Fall sighting of Lesser Golden Plover in the short grass at the edge of the pond. After this stop, having seen 74 species thus far, most of the group disbanded. Martha bravely continued for brief stops along the Bolivar Peninsula to Bolivar Flats and to East Beach in Galveston to bring the final trip list to 103 species, including 15 species of Warblers. Who says Fall birding is bad? Beautiful weather, good birds, and delightful companions provided a very pleasant trip. Dwight Peake Renew your OG/ONC membership today! 1994 dues should be -sent along with the renewal form included in your newsletter to the address at the bottom of the form'. If your mai%g label has a "92" on it, tins is your last issue. Please call Pat Wight, 859-8817, to resolve membership problems. NOEL'S NICHE LOOKING BACK 30 YEARS AGO/FROM DECEMBER 1963 SPOONBILL by Noel Pettingell „__OG FIELD TRIP, OCT. 6, 1993: A small but enthusiastic group of birders met at Boy Scout Woods in High Island at 7:00 a.m. Finding the gates locked, Larry Branam, Mary Ellen Branan, Peggy Bailey, Martha Micks, Bob Omart, libby Price, Ron and Bethel Strawser and I began birding at Smith Oaks. The birds initially were furtive, including a well plumaged male Wilson's Warbler which delighted several with close glimpses but frustrated others. The woods resonated with the calk of Catbirds and Brown Thrashers and the grunts and squawks of Grey Squirrels. Individuals of several species of warblers appeared briefly, but finally a beautifully plumaged male Black-throated Green Warbler and American Redstart allowed close leisurely observation Libby spotted an elusive Mourning Warbler, but everyone got wonderful views of an Ovenbird, which strutted across the path ahead of us. Several Rose-breasted Grosbeaks posed to cap our visit to Smith Oaks before we headed to Boy Scout Woods to eat lunch and continue birding. Since passerine activity had declined, we checked the South Oilfield Pond which provided THE BATTLE OF THE HUMMINGBIRDS My yard is no longer a safe place to roam! Walking along, I hear an angry cluttering and a strong whir of wings, and I cringe as two aggressive midgets of the "Avian" society go zooming by within inches of my head. My yard is an arena for battling hummingbirds. In each corner is a feeder with one hungry hummer guarding it against any intruders. The trouble is there are six feeders and some fifteen hummers who don't understand the polite rule of taking turns. The battles are phenomenal! It is worse than watching a tennis match as my head turns to follow the angry antics of these midgets. In one battle the clash of bilk k ominous while one hummer actually knocks another to the ground and continues attacking. The poor hummer on the ground k helpless since he can neither -stand nor walk on hk tiny feet. My movement to hk aid k enough to scare away the attacking hummer and enables the victim to fly away apparently unharmed. Then, there k the "elevator dance," in which two hummers face each other and go up and down like two tiny elevators—a height of ten feet!