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The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968
Image 4
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968 - Image 4. July 1968. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 7, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1587/show/1580.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1968). The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1587/show/1580

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968 - Image 4, July 1968, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 7, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1587/show/1580.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVII, No. 3, July 1968
Contributor (Local)
  • Bradley, Ewell C.
  • Bradley, Julia
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date July 1968
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9853
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f001_007_004.jpg
Transcript Page 4. YELLOW-CROWNED HIGHTHERONS NESTING IN HOUSTON by Bill McClure On March 13, I968, for the third consecutive year that I am aware of, the Yellow- crowned Nightherons returned to the woods behind my house for nesting. Best construction started on March 15. The nests have all been built in a crotch on a lower, nearly horizontal, limb of Loblolly Pines, about 45 to 50 feet above the ground, about 12 to 15 feet out from the trunk. Hest material is obtained by breaking twigs off limbs of live pine trees. They never were observed obtaining nest material from the ground. Hatching occurred on April 20 and 26. The egg shells were discarded at the nest site, rather than being carried away. One discarded egg contained a chick which had died in the shell. The young were "house broke" soon after hatching. It is a mystery how the ugly, awkward chicks can climb to the edge of the nest, turn around and relieve themselves without falling. The "white-wash" on the ground easily marks the nest site. The only identifiable food items have been parts of crawfish. By mid-May the young were often seen standing on the limb outside the nest. By mid- June they were flying well. By late June they were only at the nest tree for roosting. The night of June 30 was the last that any of the herons roosted in the woods. This year three pair raised 14 young. Blue Jays were observed harrassing the herons on several occasions. Most of the activity was vocal but several times a jay was seen diving at a heron. The heron usually just ducked its head to avoid contact. In 1967 one egg was found under a nest and it appeared to have been eaten by a bird whose bill would have been about the size of a jay's beak. This circumstantial evidence suggests that the Blue Jay may be guilty. The following has been sent to us by Russ Clapper: NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, DEKALB. ILLINOIS 60115: During May through July, Ring-billed Galls from three Great Lakes colonies will be wing-marked with 1.5 inch- diameter "Safeflag" tags. Each colony is represented by a specific color. An attempt is being made to determine the dispersal pattern, migration route, and winter range for each population. Anyone observing such wing-marked gulls is asked to notify Dr. William E. Southern, Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois, 6OII5. The following information is desired: date, exact location, marker color, and the observer's name. Assistance in this project will be greatly appreciated. Respondents will be provided with information pertaining to colony locations and the date of marking. PRAIRIE CHICKENS by Dirk Hagemeyer An informative article on the Attwater Prairie Chicken by Max H. Jacobs appeared in the "South Texan," the official publication of the South Texas Chamber of Commerce. The article gives a complete history on the fight to save the Prairie Chicken. It even mentions Attwater's speech before the biology section of the Scientific Society of San Antonio in December, 1916 - quote "There should be a closed season on Prairie Chickens and Antelope for a number of years to come." Already in those days, 50 years ago, we had persons concerned with threatened wildlife. The main part of the article is concerned with the 30 year struggle by Val Lehmann, the Wildlife Manager of the King Ranch, to establish a Prairie Chicken sanctuary, Quoting from the article, "Lehmann had devoted nearly 30 years of his life to studying these prairie birds and fighting to save them. He first counted the chickens in 1937 and found only 8,700 - the pitiful remnant of hundreds of thousands. In 1956 when he made another survey, there were only 3.500 birds left. Seven years later, in 1963, another search turned up only 1,335 - a reduction in 25 years of 7,365 birds, or 85 percent - a rate of decline greater than that of the Whooping Crane." The article then relates in detail the history whieh finally led to the establishment of the Prairie Chicken Sanctuary near Eagle Lake. And then came hurricane Beulah in September, 1967. Again I quote "Working closely with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Cemmission, and with Tom O'Connor, Jr., Dennis O'Connor, Tom McCann, Patrick H. Welder, David Wintermann, and the late Dan Braman donating the use of their private helicopters, Lehmann spent the last six months of 1967 cheeking all former Prairie Chicken rangesin Texas and Louisiana. Among other things, he found that Hurricane Beulah, in September, I967, had created a sudden crisis. Only about 1,070 birds remained alive." But there is a ray of hope for their survival. Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Tatton of Corpus Christi have donated 7,000 acres - adjoining the Aransas Wildlife Refuge - to the Federal Government. And on the refuge in Colorado County the chickens increased from 25 in 1965 to 58 birds in 1967. Furthermore, 25 chickens from Ellington Field have been