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The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968
Image 3
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968 - Image 3. July 1968. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1587/show/1579.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1968). The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1587/show/1579

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968 - Image 3, July 1968, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1587/show/1579.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVII, No. 3, July 1968
Contributor (Local)
  • Bradley, Ewell C.
  • Bradley, Julia
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date July 1968
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9853
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f001_007_003.jpg
Transcript Page 3. caused by the adult bird as it lands, stimulate the baby to thrust its head up, beak agape, until it is stuffed with food or the trembling neck muscles give way. By the fourth day, the baby's eyes are open-and at the age of six days, the young bird can stand, stretch, and make preening attempts at its budding feathers. By the ninth day, the bird is decently clothed with feathers and able to leave the nest. The fledgling may launch out on its own, or need to be coaxed by its parents. Out of the nest, the bird remains in hiding while calling pitifully to be fed. The parents continue to feed the young one while it learns the arts of flying, food getting, and avoiding enemies. The young bird may be on its own by four weeks of age or as late as seven weeks. Bird families which hatch altricial young include pelicans, pigeons, road- runners, woodpeckers, swifts, and nearly all songbirds. A precocial chick looks decidedly unpromising as it emerges from its egg. Wet, matted, and feeble, it sprawls in the remains of the shell. Within the hour, the young bird dries to a fetching fluff of golden down, with sparkling black eyes. The insulating down is thickest on the underparts of a water bird, and on the back of a land bird. The chick, or duckling, at one hour of age can stand, run to follow its parent, and importantly flap its nubbin wings. The parent takes the brood away fromthe nest area as soon as each has hatched. A chick begins feeding immediately, pecking enthusiastically where the parent shows it. A duckling is marched to water, where it splashily seines food from the surrounding water. The duckling of a diving duck or loon, must wait for the adult to bring food up from the bottom. By the third day, the young bird grooms its honey-colored fuzz, and enjoys sun and dust baths just like the grownups. It is already adept at scratching dirt or, if it is a duckling, it can tip up and dive for food. The precocial youngster stays with its family group, and it is truly a lost baby who gets separated from the safety of the family. This social group bond lasts until the youngster can fly. A land bird may take two to four weeks to fly; a water bird six to 12 weeks. The adult bird often continues supervision of the brood even after flight is achieved. Bird families boasting precocial young include geese, ducks, turkey, quail, cranes, and rails. Then there are bird babies which are neither typically altricial or precocial. These in-between babies, usually the offspring of larger sized birds, require special attention for a lengthy period. Birds of prey, herons, spoonbills, gulls, terns, and albatrosses are a few birds with non-conforming young. The just hatched chick is helpless, but clothed in pearly down. It is completely dependent on its parents. This is a time of frantic activity for the parent to keep the youngster fed. Independence from the parent is slow in coming. Spoonbills begin practicing flying at six weeks, great horned owls at 12 weeks, and albatrosses at eight months. The sand-colored chick of gulls and terns is also dependent for a protracted interval, but at least is able to walk soon after hatching. This fluffy chick moves to vegetation when the sun or rain threatens discomfort. Motherhood is as demanding an activity for wildlife species as it is for their human neighbors. Until ready to move about and fend for themselves, bird hatch- lings are dependent upon the adult. Childraising does not oome easy to any animal, even birds." HARD-LUCK CARDINALS by Bill McClure A pair of Cardinals nested in the woods behind my house during June of I967. The Blue Jays found the nest and during the week before the eggs hatched they made numerous attempts to get to the nest. The Cardinals fought them off and the eggs hatched on June 28. On June 29 the babies were eaten by a Texas Rat Snake. The Cardinals then built a nest in a hedge next door. It was accidentally destroyed when the hedge was trimmed. On June 6, 1968, this year's nest was found. It contained two eggs, one of which was the egg of a Brown-headed Cowbird. On the ground was a Cardinal egg which had been punctured and discarded. The Cowbird egg hatched on June 14. The Cardinal egg never hatched. Between June 21 and 24, the young Cowbird disappeared from the nest. Since the Cardinals were not feeding it, a predator is suspected. The Cardinals have started a new nest nearby. It is time their luck changed!