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The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968
Image 2
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968 - Image 2. July 1968. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 7, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1587/show/1578.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1968). The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1587/show/1578

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968 - Image 2, July 1968, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 7, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1587/show/1578.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 17, No. 3, July 1968
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XVII, No. 3, July 1968
Contributor (Local)
  • Bradley, Ewell C.
  • Bradley, Julia
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date July 1968
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 1
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9853
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f001_007_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2. full nuptial plumage? It would be an accomplishment if we could clarify just this one point, or any information on courtship behaviour. Every little bit is welcome and probably news. Maybe with this sighting Nature wanted to make up for the wrong it did me the previous weekend.... On May 30th, early in the morning, while the dew was still on the grass, I located a Least Bittern nest with three eggs, in a wet meadow. On June 1st I checked the nest and this time there were five eggs. Two weeks later, on June 15th, I placed a blind in the vicinity. The bird was still incubating (five eggs). The incubation period is from 16 - 19 days, thus there had to be a nest with young very shortly. And then the rains came, inches at a time. On the weekend of the 22nd I could not get anywhere near the nest. And even if I had braved the rain and waded in I would not have been able to photograph due to poor light. Instead I got a Carolina Wren nesting in Russ' bird feeder, with.electronic flash. I finally was able to check the Least Bittern nest on June 29th. The chance for good pictures of Least Bitterns being fed on the nest was gone. The young were still there, but disappeared from the nest when I approached and hid in the grass. - No Least Bittern pictures this year. And so, the joys and frustrations of nature photography goes on. However, the sight of the male MASKED DUCK made my heart beat somewhat faster! (Incidentally Dirk called this observation of the MASKED DUCK to the Rare Bird Alert when he returned to Houston June 29th). BIRD STUDY PROJECT by Wallace C. Mebane, Jr. I onee heard Jerry Strickling say to learn the local birds first. This advice was echoed recently by Roger Tory Peterson in an article in the AUDUBON magazine. All members have been asked to select a local common bird for a 12 month study project. This is a good time to start since many of the birds are still nesting. We can observe the nesting habitat, learn to identify the young, and find out what kind of food the parent birds bring to the nursery. I am keeping records of who is studying which bird. Please drop me a line at 7106 Mobud, Houston, Texas 77036 or telephone me at PR 4-9435. NORTH AMERICAN NEST-RECORD CARD PROGRAM by Wallace C. Mebane, Jr. One of our newest OG members, Bill McClure, has recorded more nests than anyone else in the group. Any member who needs nest-reeord cards may obtain them by contacting me at PR 4-9435 in the evening, or at CA 4-5541 during the day. The program, at Cornell University, now has approximately 55,000 completed cards on file, representing 465 species of birds. The Outdoor Nature Club is one of the 162 Regional Centers located throughout the United States and Canada. Consult the Check-list for birds known to nest in our area. Perhaps you can discover a new one. According to records kept by Noel Pettingell, nests of the Ameriean Oystercatcher and the Masked Duck were added in 1967. SPEAKING OF HESTING - The Eds.came across the following article written by Nancy McGowan in her column JUNIOR SPORTSMEN in the July, 1968 issue of TEXAS PARKS & WILDLIFE magazine. We reprint it with the magazine's permission: "Most baby birds come in two styles: altrioial (from Latin altrix, to nurse) and precocial (from Latin prae, before and ooquere, to ripen). Altricial young require intensive care for a brief period. Precocial young need minimum care for a long period. The altricial youngster strugles out of its egg looking as if it should have stayed longer. Blind, nearly naked, and totally helpless, it is completely dependent on its parents for food. The young bird is too weak to respond to offers of food for the first few hours. The last of the yolk in its stomach provides nourishment until the parents take over. Vibrations of the nest,