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The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 8, August 1994
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 8, August 1994 - Image 1. August 1994. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1523/show/1515.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1994). The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 8, August 1994 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1523/show/1515

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 8, August 1994 - Image 1, August 1994, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1523/show/1515.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 8, August 1994
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date August 1994
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9879
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f015_007_001.jpg
Transcript The Volume 43, No. 8 August 1994 Spoonbill Published by The Ornithology Group, Outdoor Nature Club, Houston Inner Loop, Urban Red-tailed Hawks Driving past the HL&P power distribution center at Newcastle and Westpark, two soaring hawks were observed on the 1 Oth of May. They looked like Red-tailed Hawks, which seemed an odd sighting in May. Suddenly the work-related seminar I was to attend appealed to me less and less. Stopping to get a closer look with binoculars, I confirmed that they were Red-tails. With interest piqued, I decided to look over the area. The property, just south of the Westpark R.R. bridge, is a maze of electric cables crowded with metal frame towers. Uninviting, it is surrounded by a chain link fence and guarded 24 hours a day.. Red-tailed Hawks are regular, but not a common nesting bird on the Upper coastal plains. This fact came as a pleasant surprise when we did field studies for the Texas Breeding Bird Adas project a few years ago. After searching about 30 rrdnutes.with the two hawks in sight, a hoped-for nest was not located. Leaving, I took one last look upward at a tower already studied twice. A third hawk looked down at me from directly above. A mass of sticks was packed into the end of the lowest tower arm with two young birds sitting at the edge of the nest looking at me. They appeared ready to fledge. The HL&P area proved entertaining over the next two weeks. Spotted a single, and then two Western Kingbirds, almost certainly nesting. Killdeer nesting along the R.R. tracks, tons of starling fledglings, many many grackles and Mourning Doves, all with young were seen.. On Friday (the 13th) both young hawks were out of the nest on top of the arm structure stretching their wings. One was hopping around and up into the air. Both remained in view while I approached on the Westpark bridge; the nest tower was closest to the bridge of all the towers in the field. One of the young was noticeably smaller than the other. The smaller was the more active of the pair. The larger was very rusty on upper breast and very dark on the back. Both were strongly marked with belly bands. The next day no birds were seen at or near the tower. It wasn't till the next Saturday that I finally saw the two young birds away from the nest. They had moved about two structures over and were stationary with some hopping around and very little flying. Occasionally through the summer a Red-tailed Hawk soared past my office window a few miles north of the nest site. Each time I'd wonder if this was a traveler just passing through, or an inner city dweller like myself. Richard Uzar