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The Spoonbill, Vol. 46, No. 12, December 1997
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 46, No. 12, December 1997 - Image 3. December 1997. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 25, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/152/show/150.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1997). The Spoonbill, Vol. 46, No. 12, December 1997 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/152/show/150

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 46, No. 12, December 1997 - Image 3, December 1997, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 25, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/152/show/150.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 46, No. 12, December 1997
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Carey, Damien F.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date December 1997
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 21
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9882
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f021_010_003.jpg
Transcript A Publication of the Houston Outdoor Nature Club Neotropical Crossroads Over 410 species of birds—from hawks to hummingbirds, shorebirds to waterfowl, and many colorful songbirds such as warblers, tanagers, thrushes, flycatchers, vireos, and many others—either live year around, or migrate through, the Lower Rio Grande Valley/Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge Complex (LRGVC). There are few places on the North American continent that see so many different species of birds. Why the large number of bird species come to this area? Location, Location, Location. Similar to Cape May National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey, and Kiktopeake Point in Virginia, the LRGVC is located at the bottom of the tip of a land-funnel in south Texas. Locate the refuge on the map and you can see that birds from the eastern and mid-western regions of the continent funnel into this area. The LRGVC is located at the convergence of two major flyways, the Mississippi and the Central flyways. The Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific flyways are general routes which birds tend to migrate along. Because birds are fun- neling into the Lower Rio Grande Valley from both the Mississippi and the Central flyways, a great number of different species stop down at the refuge and surrounding areas. In late August, birds start drifting southward across the continent. They move through the area from mid-September. Fall migration takes place at a more leisurely pace than spring migration when birds race to get to their breeding grounds. Many of birds that migrate through the LRGVC Neotropical migratory birds, birds which nest in the United States or Canada, and spend the winter months in Mexico, Central or South America, or the Caribbean. Some 346 species of birds in the Western Hemisphere are Neotropical migrants. A whopping 196 of these stop down to rest and refuel at the LRGVC. Tens of thousands of bird watchers come to the refuge complex each year to spot Neotropical songbirds, hawks, shorebirds, and waterfowl as well as the resident birds. From the LRGVC, the Neotropical migratory birds will move on to Mexico and points south. Depending on the weather in any given year, some species will migrate down the coast of the Gulf of Mexico while others will take off over the Gulf. Because the refuge complex is right on the Mexican border, it is a crossroads of migration and hundreds of thousands of birds continuously fly back and forth between the United States and Mexico. Some biologists worry that populations of some Neotropical migratory birds are declining. The Neotropical migratory songbirds seem to be at greater risk than resident songbirds. Why? Because Neotropical migratory songbirds travel over such long distances, they are vulnerable to loss of forest, grassland, wetland, and coastal habitats in their breeding grounds, wintering grounds, and a huge number of stopover points along the way. When breeding, and stopover habitats are lost to development in the United States and Canada, or the tropical and semitropical forests are cut for agriculture and cattle ranching in wintering grounds, populations of some Neotropical migratory songbird species have declined. The LRGVC is located in the river delta at the extreme southern end of the Lower Rio Grande Valley, which stretches cont'd last page Field Trips Attwater NWR Sat., Jan. 10 @ 8:30 a.m. Go West!. Sparrows and Raptors will be the focus today. We could see 10 kinds of sparrows, plus Bald Eagle, White- tailed Hawk, Crested Caracara, and Sprague's Pipit. There will be lots of Waterfowl around and this has been a very good place for Least Grebes for the last several years. Contact: David Sarkozi (713) 520-5906. Anahuac NWR Wed, Jan. 21 @ 8 a.m. Meet Howard at the sign-in stand. Contact: Howard Patton (713) 992-5640