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The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 7, July 1984
Image 4
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 7, July 1984 - Image 4. July 1984. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 7, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1514/show/1511.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1984). The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 7, July 1984 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1514/show/1511

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 7, July 1984 - Image 4, July 1984, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 7, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1514/show/1511.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 7, July 1984
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXIII, No. 7, July 1984
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date July 1984
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 18
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9869
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f018_007_004.jpg
Transcript in May; so we scrambled up the hill as unobtrusively as possible and set up the scope above the nest. Ms. Gos. looked magnificent, as she brooded her eggs. Her ruby eye bordered by the white eyebrow further complemented this handsome raptor and this event became one of the trips highlights by universal acclaim. Farther up the trail and a few yards into the underbrush, a Northern Pygmy owl was heard. After much scrambling about, It was located in a large evergreen. The bonus that comes with discovering this owl is that sometimes the birds discover it too, providing a real treat for the observer: various warblers, Painted redstarts and flycatchers, in this instance, persisted in the area. Later in the morning an invigorating hike up Scheelite Canyon produced a lovely Spotted Owl. The bird was perched right over our path! Needless to say, everyone got a first-hand look as the bird dozed fitfully. Throughout the week, Caroline Callery and Helene Kimball were most helpful in identifying such plants as lavender bee balm, apache plume, alligator juniper, white datura, lupine, wild blue iris and the spectacular yellow and orange agave spires. Afternoons, too, were very enjoyable; some of us swam in the pools provided by the various establishments, others napped or shopped, whatever the mood struck. Bask and Robbins in Sierra Vista was not overlooked and several of us enjoyed towering cups of their low-cal ice cream. I especially enjoyed reminiscing with Carol Sloan and Bob and Edith Willman about our Big Bend trip last September. Back out into the crisp morning air, a visit to the famous Patagonia picnic table was first on our agenda. There we saw a male Rose-throated Becard building its second nest of the season in a large sycamore. Thick-billed Kingbirds also nested in the same tree, and Phainopeplas were everywhere! At the Patagonia-Sonoita Creek Nature Sanctuary Varied Bunting, Lazuli Bunting and a pair of Gray Hawks held us in awe. Later in the afternoon a portion of our group travelled in search of Cassin's and Botteri's sparrows. Incredibly, it wasn't long before Bob's tape excited a Botteri's to such an extent taht it flew right over us alighting only a few feet away - every detail unmistakable. Cassin's Sparrow eluded us, however, even though Al Valentine's sharp eyes were always on the lookout for it. An additional treat in the Patagonia area was observing through the scope a Zone-tailed hawk shielding her one down-covered nestling from the sun with her body. Oru final destination was Bear Mountain Ranch jsut outside Silver City New Mexico. En route Dr. Harold Haley entertained the van group with a chapter on birdwatching surreptitiously inserted in the medical book Mortal Lessons by Richard Selzer, M.D. Spending time at Bear Mountain Ranch was the perfect way to round a terrific week. Mrs. McCormack, our hostess, was most accomodating and the large old two-story house we stayed in was charming. Say's Phoebe, Plain Titmouse Black-chinned Hummingbird and Gambel's Quail along with Black-headed Grosbeak Scrub and Gray breasted Jays were regulars around the house and feeders. Morning and evening walks in the area were a special treat with the gragrant rain-soaked air reminiscent of the odor of curry. This combination was the gorgeous sunrises and sunsets made it an unforgetable experience. Recapping some other birds seen this week they included Green backed and Great Blue Herons' Ring necked Pheasant Montezuma and Scaled Quail Band-tailed ^^ Pigeon; Great Horned and Barn Owls-; UW Gila, Ladder-backed, Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers; Northern Beardless-Tyrrannulet; Greater Pewee, Horned Lark; Western Bluebird; Bendire's and Crissal Thrashers; Pyrrhuloxia; Abert's Towhee; and Evening Grosbeak. The final tally of the week's sightings produced 163 species. True to form there was excitement right up through the journey homeward. While stoppign in New Mexico to view an immature Golden Eagle atop a telephone pole, a Burrowing Owl was found tangled in the barbed wire fence. Teh little bird was still alive and our leaders carefully removed him and placed him in a sock to immobilize the wings. Yoda, as he was dubbed, was smuggled aboard the plane, word was out quickly, however, and he soon became the central attraction. The flight attendants showered us with bloody marys ostensibly for the owl, but Ben decided that his needs were greater. Even the pilot came back for a look. At this wirting, I understand one wing is broken but the owl should hopefully be back to' normal in due time with veterinary care by O.G. member, Dr. Larry White. (The owl died before surgery could be performed Editor) All in all this trip was filled with a spirit of comeraderie by those who participated. Everyone got their share of teasing, and all were great sports. ^^ In conclusion, I feel that the *&f remarkable talents of our leaders, Ben ^^ Feltner and Bob Behrstock, coupled with • the special enjoyment of each other's company made this vacation a memorable one indeed.