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The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 7, July 1984
Image 3
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 7, July 1984 - Image 3. July 1984. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 7, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1514/show/1510.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1984). The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 7, July 1984 - Image 3. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1514/show/1510

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 7, July 1984 - Image 3, July 1984, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 7, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1514/show/1510.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 7, July 1984
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXIII, No. 7, July 1984
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date July 1984
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 18
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9869
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 3
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f018_007_003.jpg
Transcript I/O* THE O.G. TRIP TO SOUTHEASTERN ARIZONA by Wanda Smith Birding in Southeastern Arizona has long been an item on my "must" list and this O.G. trip surpassed my highest expectations. After only five days into the trip we had seen eight species of owls and heard a ninth. That's over a third of the North American total. By the fourth day we had seen seven species of hummingbirds. ^k Our nine day tour began in El Haso where we picked up a van and a station wagon to begin our drive to Portal, Arizona. Birding along the way we found Burrowing Owls, Black-throated Sparrows, Chihuahuan Ravens, Swainson's Hawks and Western Kingbirds to name a few. By mid-afternoon we had arrived at Cave Creek Ranch, located in the Chiricahua Mountains. Here we would stay for the next three nights. Birds were everywhere! Bridled Titmouse, Gambel's Quail, Lucy's Warbler, Curve-billed Thrasher, Acorn Woodpecker, White-breasted Nuthatch, Bronzed Cowbird and Brown-crested Flycatcher were common yard birds. After settling into our rooms our group headed for the hummingbird feeders next door at the Spofford's Aquila Rancho. There we comfortably viewed such lovelies as the Magnificent Hummingbird with its luminescent emerald throat and violet crown. Big Blue-throats were equally as common and almost as spectacular, as were the Black-chins, whose radiant deep purple gorgets brought sighs from one and all. But the most exciting visitor at these feeders was a timy female Lucifer hummer, sporting a gracefully down-curved bill, lovely green back and warm buffy breast. The rarity of this event was brought home to us by the fact that Ben had only seen this bird in Arizona twice before. An after dinner owl prowl provided us with an excellent view of a tiny Elf Owl and conversations with •lusive Flammulated and Whiskered Owls. Eterwards Margaret Haley inspired some of ' us with her operatic rendition of a classical music piece about an owl, others were less inspired. The next day bright and early, our group of eleven set out for Rustler Park hiah in the Chiricahuas. The cool mountain 3 air scented with the Ponderosa pines was exhilerating as we embarked on our adventure to locate Red-faced warblers. The park is at 8500 ft. and boasts breath-taking views of the surrounding country. On the way up we found Olive, Grace's and Virginia's Warblers as well as Yellow-eyed Juncos and three species of nuthatches feeding among the pines. The scenery on the way to find the Red-faced Warblers was beautiful and we saw Red Crossbills, Western and Hepatic Tanagers and Mexican Chickadees. The warblers responded quickly to Ben's whistled imitation of a Pygmy Owl and were held in the area by Bob's tape recorder. Everyone got a good look at this gorgeous bird. That night we visited the Southwestern Research Station of the American Museum of Natural History, a study area designated for researchers and naturalists, located in Cave Creek Canyon. Here Ben and Bob teamed up once again to call out Western Screech and Whiskered Owls. Much to our delight the birds held still in the flashlight beams and were seen well by everyone, even by the contingent that refused to leave the comfort of the car (namely Bob and Edith Willman and Carol Sloan) until the bird was located. The following morning found us heading down the South Fork trail of Cave Creek Canyon looking for Elegant Trogons . This trail differed from most others because it is fairly level. The covering canopy of Arizona sycamores, live oakes and Arizona black walnut, with an occasional opening in the trees, permit breathtaking views of the lichen covered cliffs high overhead. Trogons were heard throughout the hike and altogether we counted ten - a large number even for this area. What a magnificent bird to view! Although somewhat duller, the female was beautiful, displaying a white teardrop ear spot. The males were spectacularly georgous in geranium red and irridescent green. Additionally we counted five Strickland's Woodpeckers in this vicinity. a bird we were assured could easily be missed. Painted Redstart another strikingly beautiful bird, was spotted frequently along this trail; dropped wings and fanned tail were its particular field marks. After lunch we drove to the famous Mile Hi Nature Conservatory Center in Ramsey Canyon to round out our day.Here there were so many things to do: view hummingbirds at the dozen or so feeders (we added the elegant Anna's and Broad- billed Hummers to our list), observe the majestic Golden Eagle at its nest complete with fledglings, walk the shaded nature trail, or visit the gift shop, where a land office business was done in books and T-shirts, all to the benefit of the Nature Conservatory. Wednesday was truly an incredible birding day! We were now in the Huachuca Mountains and began our morning in Saw Mill Canyon. Here a pair of Buff-breasted Flycatchers were feeding their young in one tree and building a second nest in a nearby tree at the same time. Within sight of this activity, Ben pointed out the Goshawk nest he had found