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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 8, August 1925
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The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 8, August 1925 - Image 1. August 1925. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 25, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1507/show/1503.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1925). The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 8, August 1925 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1507/show/1503

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 8, August 1925 - Image 1, August 1925, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 25, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1507/show/1503.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Zephyr, Vol. 2, No. 8, August 1925
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date August 1925
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 28
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9623
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f028_008_001.jpg
Transcript OJ& THE ZEPHYR Monthly Bulletin of the Outdoor Nature Club of Houston, Texas. August, 1925 Vol, 2, No.8 0, what a glory doth this world put on For him who, with a fervent heart, goes forth Under the bright and glorious sky, and looks On duties well performed, and days well spent! For him the wind, ay, and the yellow leaves, Shall have a voice, and give him eloquent teachings. ~ Longfellow. Although it may seem early in the season to discuss such matters as holly conservation and use of substitutes in Christmas decorations, experience has proven that it is wise to bring the subject before the public at the time dealers are putting in their advance orders, so that they may be given full opportunity to meet the situation satisfactorily. Considering the nation-wide response to our holly conservation campaign last winter, there can be no doubt that lovers of America's outdoors are willing and eager to take whatever measures are necessary to insure the preservation of this symbolic native tree. The main difficulty to be overcome lies in the fact that our supply of holly has been so vast, in years gone by, that we have continued to use it without any thought of economy or necessity for the replenishment of the supply, and this attitude of enjoyment without responsibility seems to have become one of the characteristic features: of the present care-free jazz age. Even the largest bank account will eventually run out of funds if continually drawn on with never a deposit to hold it up. There is no need to go over the facts about the steady decrease in the supply of holly, and the failure of the efforts of the few who plant holly trees to keep up with the destruction of the many who cut them down. This is not intended to discourage the planting of holly trees - a good work being carried on by a comparatively small,number of genuine nature lovers - but simply to show that planting alone does not offer a final solution of the problem. Probably there will never be enough planters to offset the enormous quantities of holly removed each winter at the present rate of cutting. It is evident that there must be a prompt> material decrease In the use of holly -- a truce, until such time as a solution taking into consideration every phase of the problem can be worked out. And so, this year, as last, the slogan of the Outdoor Nature Club will be "Save the Holly! Use Substitutes." Nature lovers everywhere will take up the cry, and will be glad to render the fullest cooperation to dealers and merchants handling artificial substitutes, such as imitation holly, paper \vreaths, etc. In the preceding paragraphs, the holly tree has been considered strictly with regard to Its preservation as a source of supply for Yuletide decorations. For the lover of the outdoors, it has another, and far greater, significance. As cheery as is the shining sprig of holly above the mantelpiece, still more beautiful is the tall, symmetrical holly tree by the woodland path, and most wonderful of all - a scene that brings a feeling of joy and exaltation into the heart of every beholder - is the vast holly forest, a splendid army of towering trees, with rugged leaves gleaming in the sunshine and a host of birds feasting upon the clusters of rich, ruby berries. Such an experience as this is a privilege that all of us may enjoy, for there still exist in our Southern forests magnificent groves of holly trees, safe, up till now, behind barriers of jungle and swamp. But progress is rapidly conquering the wilderness, and unless timely measures are taken to preserve some of these natural wonders as a part of America's scenic heritage, the opportunity will soon be gone. Instead of erecting a countless array of edifices and monuments to our own conceit, let us of the Southland set aside and dedicate to those who must come after us a worthwhile representation of these beautiful trees of our beloved Dixie, so that gleaming forests of holly trees may be as great a source of pride and pleasure to our posterity as the impressive groves of "big trees" saved for the West.