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The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981
Image 9
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981 - Image 9. June 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/147/show/137.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1981). The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981 - Image 9. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/147/show/137

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981 - Image 9, June 1981, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/147/show/137.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXX, No. 2, June 1981
Contributor (Local)
  • Pinkston, Randy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 10
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9866
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 9
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f010_006_009.jpg
Transcript page 9 r^: the bird's weakened condition. .,j~ -; ~;L'-iom^""' As is the case with manyibird diseases, diagnosis of TB depends on postmortem examination* Lesions-occur regularly in the liver, spleen, intestines, and bone marrow, but they can occur in most other tissues except the central nervous system, (^vian TB is not primarily a respiratory condition as it is in humans.) The classic TB lesion is the grayish-yellow nodule that is found in varying sizes.and numbers throughout infected tissue. The nodule is composed of a central core of necrotic (dead) tissue, surrounded by a thick layer of connective tissue. The widespread distribution of lesions throughout the body suggests that a septicemia occurs at least for a time during the course of the disease. The presence of different sized nodules indicates that already established lesions can produce new lesions elsewhere. An infected bird can therefore undergo several episodes of self-reinfection. Transmission of avian TB is by contaminated fecal material. The nodules in the intestinal tract shed massive numbers of the TB bacilli (a bacillus is simply a micro-organism that is rod-shaped); lesions in the liver and gall bladder (organs anatomically connected to the intestinal tract) add more bacilli to the fecal discharges. Intensely populated situations, such as a poultry operation or a starling roost, the potential hazard for contamination of the premises and infection of susceptible birds is considerable. W~l'&*. In the U.S., avian TB is practically non-existent in the South and Wests the greatest incidence of it is in the North Central and North Eastern part of the country, due no, doubt to climatic conditions/ Enough is known about avian TB to eradicate it, but greater efforts „ are needed so that, as in the case of bovine and human TB, it can be-" come a desireable endangered species. i'^'i A NEW SPECIES FOR THE UTC CHECKLIST by Tony Gallucci Controversy has swirled in every path followed by the Thayer's Gull ever since the A.O.U. acceded to ornithological opinion and split it from the Herring Gull and added it to the North American Checklist. Problems have centered around the bird's occurrence in any given area, the ability to recognize the bird in the field and even the identification of specimens. This latter difficulty has now resulted in the discovery of two specimens accreditable to the UTC checklist area. - Charlie Clark, an ornithologist, now retired and residing in Rockport, recently visited the American Museum of Natural History to examine the Thayer's Gull specimen collected at Rockport by Warren Pulich. In examining the tray of Thayer's Dr. Clark found a specimen, from the late 1880's collected on Galveston Island. {jzi*k Dr. Keith Arnold has also informed me that a Thayer's Gull specimen, also from Galveston Island, is at-the University of Texas at Austin. ... This specimen is listed in Oberholser but is improperly considered a -.- California Gull. There remains a Nov. 29 specimen of California Gull from Brazoria County. Pictures taken by Greg Lasley of a probable Thayer's Gull on the UTC were turned down recently by gull experts answering queries for Dr. Arnold. But the pictures, combined with extensive written details by Lasley and Bret Whitney are yet to be acted upon by the Texas Bird Records Committee. This might provide a third, more recent, record for the area.