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The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981
Image 6
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981 - Image 6. June 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/147/show/134.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1981). The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981 - Image 6. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/147/show/134

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981 - Image 6, June 1981, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/147/show/134.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXX, No. 2, June 1981
Contributor (Local)
  • Pinkston, Randy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 10
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9866
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f010_006_006.jpg
Transcript page 6 Mountains. A pair of Zone-tailed Hawks were photographed at nest in the Dragoon Mountains and all the sparkling Arizona warblers had been observed on our first day at Mount Lemmon. To this we had added Five- striped Sparrow at Patagonia, the,first seen there in two years, and a Coppery-tailed Trogon nestside in Cave Cre^k Canyon plus all the Arizona regulars. Now with only hours to go we hear of the Black-capped Gnatcatcher, the third U.S. record. What a lagniappe that would be if we could only find it. An old friend, Kenn Kaufman, was also leading a tour in the canyon and after an evenings owling, we got together for an exchange of information. Kenn knew about the bird. The presence of which had been hushed up for fear of too much disturbance (i.e. the second U.S. record, a breeding pair and young at Patagonia, had been collected in it's entirety). After an hour or so of conference I found myself armed with an excellent map and approximately six hours of daylight in which to find the quarry. Flight connections etc. precluded oujr"using a full day so we set off in our minibus at 5s00 a.m. May 24, from the Chiricahuas heading for the upper end of Chino Canyon in the Santa Ritas, about 4§ hours drive. It was difficult to maintain a legal speed limit, but somehow we did, reaching Tucson at 8s40 a.m. where I stopped to find out from local birders if there was any status change on the birds, which were expected to fledge young any day. The latest word was about a week old. Unable to discover any recent information we fled south as fast as possible reaching the access road to Chino Canyon at about 9s15 a.m. It took us an hour to negotiate the next 20 miles by minibus. Fortunately our vehicle had a high clearance and an equally high abuse tolerance. Years of djfiving in Mexico, and Central America have prepared me for bad roads, but for this one a U.S. marine obstacle course would have been more adequate preparation. I swear that at times the front and rear of the van;, were listing in opposite directions. At one point one of the passengers asked if she might help'by getting out and removing "that fsck". This brought a roar of laughter from the rest of us as the van was crawling through a boulder field at the time, and no one could discern which particular rock was the most offensive. Perseverance and sweat paid-off, however, and we finally found ourselves at the last gate to the entrance of the canyon. Here we found a note fastened to the right-hand gate post with this brief pencil- scribbled messages "Black-capped Gnatcatchers fledged 23 May". What a disappointment we had less than two hours to find the birds in acres of canyon. it/oifi Parking the van about 150 yards from the grove of hackberries in which the birds had nested, we spread out over the wash in search of "the bird". In the process we found two more of the rare and elusive Five- striped Sparrows and several groups of Black-tailed Gnatcatchers but alas no Black-capped Gnatcatchers. Finally our attention was drawn to a group of four or five young people high up on the canyon-side. On putting my binoculars on them I noticed that they were watching us via the same method. One young lady was hand-signalling us to come to them. I immediately started running through the mesquite fearing I would arrive too late. Several of us negotiated the distance in about five.minutes to find that they had been watching both parent birds feeding In a deep ravine canyon- side. We now signalled the rest of our group, who straggled up the hill behind us. Within a minute or two we located the female about 60 yards away, not very satisfactory, but at least it was contact. By watching the actions of this tiny.mite, we were soon able to discern a pattern in her behavior. No matter where she was on the canyon floor below us, she kept disappearing into the same Hackberry bush. Back down we clambered and working our way around the thick thorn-