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The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981 - Image 2. June 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/147/show/130.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(June 1981). The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/147/show/130

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981 - Image 2, June 1981, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/147/show/130.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 1981
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXX, No. 2, June 1981
Contributor (Local)
  • Pinkston, Randy
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date June 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 10
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9866
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f010_006_002.jpg
Transcript page 2 cate about half-store and four and five indicate fat birds. During the first two days at the site, the measured fat covered a rather wide range, i.e., many birds in each class. Generally this probably shows a slow, constant migration of passerines, some arriving as others are leaving, etc. Just how much fat is used by birds crossing the Gulf of Mexico in migration and how is it affected by weather and distance traveled and how long does it take before the birds have regained a full fat store and are ready to continue? Collecting this data would be simple in this location where, during a fallout, one could be sure of the immediate origin of the birds being examined. Such migrants are frequently recaptured during ensuing days and rechecking the weights and fat contents of these repeats might shed light on this question. Theories were not hard to come by. The one that best stood the test of time after discussions with Ben Feltner, Greg Lasley, Kelly Bryan, and Jim Morgan was as follows; Because of the very strong south winds that had been blowing all spring the "birds were getting a free ride— they had to use very little energy of any kind to cross the gulf. Thus birds hitting the coast would still retain a hefty fat store. It would remain to be seen if, after the passage of the storms, birds making landfall would be carrying less fat. Derivative theories include these; if birds are able to detect such storms at a great distance (studies have shown that migrant passerines are able to detect storms up to 1500 miles away because of ultrasound frequencies caused by the storms), it seems rather logical that they would steer for a coast least likely to be affected by turbulent weather and, if so, one would expect the largest fallout during a storm preceded by long periods of calm weather or south winds; and the first heavy storms of the season, if preceded by very strong southeast winds, would be most likely to produce larger numbers of the rarer eastern coast migrant warblers such as Cerulean, Black-throated Blue, Cape May and Blackpoll. Both of these would eventually be tested. The canopy feeding warblers were not often caught in the nets. Note the high numbers banded of waterthrushes, Kentuckys, Ovenbirds, Hood- eds, etc., over the several day period, but the small number of Bay- breasteds, Chestnut-sideds and Tennessees. At the Johnson's this is because there are very high oaks in which the canopy species can feed. When banding in a fallout in a salt-cedar grove or low-canopied area many more of the canopy feeders are caught. Species Banding Totals for Johnson's Place, Bolivar Peninsula, April 18 to May 25 Species April -ia4, May 18 19 22 23 25 26 27 28 29 4- 5 6 20 25 Yellow-b. Cuckoo Ruby-thr. Hummingbird Belted Kingfisher Yellow-bell. Sapsuck'r. Eastern Kingbird Great Crested Flyc. Yellow-bell. Flyc. Acadian Flycatcher Traill's Flyc. (Willow/Alder) Eastern Wood Pewee Blue Jay House Wren Gray Catbird Brown Thrasher Wood Thrush Swainson's Thrush Gray-cheeked Thrush Veery 1 1 8 18 9 24- 34- 25 12 14- 2 1 1 1 9 7 3 2 1 6 2 1 1 1 1 9 4 3 2 4 1 1 2 6 4 3 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 7 8 82 44- 27 6 12 5 8 14- 1 1 13 3 1 1 17 5 2 2 5 1 2 1 12 2 2 3 5 1 4- 5 1 3 6 6 3 3 1 3 5 3