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The Spoonbill, Vol. 21, No. 12, April 1973
Image 2
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 21, No. 12, April 1973 - Image 2. April 1973. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1400/show/1391.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1973). The Spoonbill, Vol. 21, No. 12, April 1973 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1400/show/1391

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 21, No. 12, April 1973 - Image 2, April 1973, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1400/show/1391.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 21, No. 12, April 1973
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXI, No. 12, April 1973
Contributor (Local)
  • Greenbaum, Laura
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date April 1973
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 16
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9858
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f016_004_002.jpg
Transcript Page 3 However, Mr, & Mrs. Charles Hooks have given her permission to set up nature trails on their estate near Tomball for the benefit of school children. This Is a private home and will not be open to the public, Mrs. Bondi would like some help in identifying the birds, their food supplies, and habitat, on this estate. If you are interested in giving a few hours to help Mrs. Bondi you may reach her at her home phone number: 667-5225; school number: 747-8803; or husband's number: 667-5661, THE DAY OF THE HAWKS ON KING RANCH by Maxine and Richard Davis On Saturday, March 24, fifty-one people met at the Holiday Inn in Kingsvllle, at 7:30 A.M. for a field trip into the famed King Ranch. The main objective was birding, and every one came fully equipped with binoculars, telescopes and cameras. The Field Trip Chairman, Sharon Hackleman, had arranged with Mr. Val Lehmann to guide the caravan over the ranch. Mr. Lehmann retired recently, after twenty-eight years as Wildlife and Conservation Director on the King Ranch. His familiarity with the area and knowledge of the historical background was most interesting and enlightening. He knew all the best places to see birds. There were large herds of deer, as well as many cattle and horses. The prairie wild flowers were blooming in a beautiful profusion of color, and with a clear sky, bright sun and cool breeze, it was altogether a perfect field day. At one stop, while observing a hawk, the sky was suddenly full of Broadwing Hawks, soaring and wheeling in effortless rhythm. There were many hundreds and they presented a most spectacular sight, especially if one had never seen a great hawk migration. In the course of the day there were fourteen species of hawks seen, including Harris Hawk, Pigeon Hawk, White-tailed Hawk, Black Hawk, and White-tailed Kite. Picnic lunches were eaten at noon In and around the old camp house. After spending an hour walking around this area, the caravan moved on to other parts of the ranch. The land is generally a flat plain, but there are large areas of wet lands, lakes and bays where water and shore bird are found. There is also much low mesquite and other trees that invite the small birds. The varied ecology has something to offer nearly any bird species. In the final count for the day there were one hundred species listed.. Of special note were Pyrrhuloxia, Black-bellied Tree Ducks, Sprague's Pipit, Violet-green Swallow, Cactus Wren, Turkeys, Pectoral Sandpiper and Lark Bunting. Everyone agreed it was a very good day, and all were grateful to Mr. Lehmann for making the trip such a pleasure. There were several reports of large hawk migration flights on Sunday, near Rockport and Aransas Refuge. MARCH: GOOD EARLY MIGRATION AND A BROKEN RECORD by T. Ben Feltner The month of March produced a very nice early migration, of small land migrants. Vic Emanuel and yours truly recorded 25 species of warblers within the month. Including an unprecedented Cape May Warbler which wriggled under the wire on the 31st, and a record-tying American Redstart at West Blvd. on the 30th. The best day was the 24th of March which was preceded by foul weather: rain and overcast with a wind shift from South to North. On that day we recorded 271 individuals of 13 species. Champion with high count was Parula with 120, followed by Myrtle and Hooded tied for second with 80 individuals apiece. Six Louisiana Waterthrushes resprsented a new total dally high for both observers. Vireos also figured in the wave three species being found. White-eyed, as usual, were most abundant with a count of 75, followed by Yellow-throated with 35, and trailed bv Red-eved Vireos with ten. Worm-eating Warblers peaked on the 31st with 13 being found. Early Ceruleans were reported by Jerry Smith on