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The Spoonbill, Vol. 45, No. 2, February 1996
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 45, No. 2, February 1996 - Image 1. February 1996. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1389/show/1379.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1996). The Spoonbill, Vol. 45, No. 2, February 1996 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1389/show/1379

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 45, No. 2, February 1996 - Image 1, February 1996, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1389/show/1379.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 45, No. 2, February 1996
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date February 1996
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 19
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9881
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f019_002_001.jpg
Transcript Volume 45, No. 2 February 1996 The Spoonbill Published by The Ornithology Group, Outdoor Nature Club, Houston It's Not Just § Chicken Feed Anymore. by Fred Collins As director of a nature center and a lifelong birdwatcher, I have tried a variety of bird feeding ideas. At the Hanna and Arthur Ginzbarg Nature Discovery Center in Russ Pitman Park we have a bird feeder with four separate bins. We can offer four different seeds or seed mixes at the same feeder. Currently we are experimenting with a commercially prepared parrot pellet of about 14% protein It is advertised as a complete diet for parrots. So far, not even the squirrels have tried this strange looking offering. It took over a month before anything ate the safflower. Large, gray-striped sunflower seeds are surprisingly slow to be eaten, and the local fauna was completely stumped by shell peanuts. Even squirrels didn't recognize it as food! The favorites are black-oil sunflower and wild bird mix (mostly red and white millet). The millet, very attractive to doves, is relished by the five species of dove at the Nature Center. At our family farm in central Texas I feed birds on the crushed rock drive outside my office window. I use black-oil sunflower and parakeet mix, ■which attracts Savannah and Chipping Sparrows. The black-oil sunflower attracts various finches, goldfinches, House Finches, Northern Cardinals and occasionally Zonotrichia sparrows. The large, open lawn area beyond the drive is frequented by meadowlark, pipits and killdeer. I sometimes spread chicken scratch for blackbirds, and noticed recently the occasional use of this scratch by meadowlark and pipit The pipit would pick through the shells of the sunflower, looking for what fve yet to determine. Recently I put parakeet mix and sunflower seeds on one side of the drive, and about 10 feet away on the other side, chicken scratch Meadowlarks, pipits and killdeer stayed in the scratch area, but looked at the seed more than they ate. I men mixed some chick starter with the scratch. Bingo! The chick starter, about 30% protein, is relished by pipits and killdeer. The meadowlarks eat more of the starter than the scratch, but eat both regularly. Today, a new group of birds is eating the starter: five crows. It is interesting that sparrows and finches give the crows a twenty-foot berth, almost the same they give the cats. Fve only been feeding the starter for a week The rest of the winter will prove very interesting. Fred Collins is director of the Hanna and Arthur Ginzbarg Nature Discover Center in Russ Pitman Park, Bellaire, Texas. He maintains a flock of over 30 species of parrots at his Center for Avian Research.