Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 1, January 1994
Image 6
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 1, January 1994 - Image 6. January 1994. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1371/show/1366.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1994). The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 1, January 1994 - Image 6. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1371/show/1366

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 1, January 1994 - Image 6, January 1994, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1371/show/1366.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 43, No. 1, January 1994
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date January 1994
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 15
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9879
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f015_001_006.jpg
Transcript observed thk winter on the refuge, spent the day hidden from view. Species seen in higher than usual numbers were Pied-billed Grebe, Great Egret, White and White-faced Ibk, Ross' Goose, Wood Duck, Redhead, Sharp-shinned and Cooper's Hawk, Virginia Rail, Sandhill Crane, Gray Catbird, Orange-crowned Warbler, Common Yellowthroat and Song Sparrow. Species seen in unusually low numbers were Canada Goose, Mourning and Ground Dove, Barn Owl, House Wren, Sprague's Pipit and Grasshopper Sparrow. Unfortunately, once again, no Prairie-Chickens were seen. Thanks to the skill of the area leaders and participant-, I'm sure thk k still the best inland count in the nation Winnie Burkett, Compiler A Tree Full of Hummingbirds by Winnie Burkett Now, if someone told you that they had seen a tree full of hummingbirds, wouldn't you assume that it was ako a tree full of flowers? Well—I would have until last October. On October 3, 1993, Houston Audubon had a workday at Boy Scout Woods. While we were working a birder came up to tell me that there was an oak tree by the barn behind Smith Oaks that was full of hummingbirds. I had my doubts, but some of the work party participants went over to look and returned to report that there was indeed an oak tree full of hummingbirds. They ako reported that the hummers, warblers and orioles seemed to be feeding on sap being exuded by acorn caps left on the tree after the acorns had fallen out. After the work party finished I had to go look. It was easy to find the live oak, you could hear the hummingbirds before you could see them. There were lots, between 25 and 50, swarming around the tree. They were impossible to count as many were arguing over who could drink out of which acorn cap. The Northern Orioles and several species of warblers were also feeding from the acorn caps. It was an amazing sight. Being curious I pulled an acorn out of its cap and investigated. The sap was sticky and very sweet. Only caps of acorns that were loose enough to fall out exuded the sweet sap. Since only one tree in the area had birds, while many other trees had acorns, I set out to do a little "research." I checked acorn caps on other trees and found that no other tree's acorn caps exuded sweet sap. Their sap was not too tasty. Thk sighting generated several questions. Why did only one tree in that area have sweet sap? Was the tree diseased? Are there other live oaks that produce sweet sap? So far I only have an answer to the last question. One of the women my husbands works with had an oak tree in her yard full of hummingbirds last fall. She enjoyed the birds, but couldn't figure out why they were there. There may be other oak trees full of hummingbirds out there. So keep your eyes and ears open thk fall. NOEL'S NICHE LOOKING BACK by Noel Pettingell 30 YEARS AGO/FROM NOVEMBER 19/B SPOONBn I. [Please note thk Niche was intended for the Nov. 1993 ksue, not the Jan. 1994! My apologies to Noel for the mixup. Thk will teach him not to be too prompt with hk submissions. Ed.] "We tend to place value on rarity at all levek of experience. Perhaps that k why these few days live so vividly in my mind. But I think not I have seen other birds rarer in museum collections and about which much less k known. My experiences were in no way unique; others have seen Ivorybilk, and some have known them far more intimately. I have had higher adventure in more exotic places. No, it was the stamp of Fate which impressed thk experience upon me. Nature k little concerned with the fate of the individual, but there k no greater tragedy in the scheme of things than the extinction of a species." "Search for the Rare IvorybilT by Don Eckleberry from Discovery, a book of short stories. CLEARING HOUSE DECEMBER 1993 Editors: Phyllis and Tony Frank A total of 209 species were reported. Interesting sightings of wintering (?) waterfowl and wintering raptors are included in this report. Many thanks to everyone who submitted reports and documentation. Reports for next month are due by February, but early reports are welcomed. Readers are reminded that all decisions regarding checklist status are made by the checklist committee. Publication of a rarity does not imply acceptance of the record by the editors or the committee. The CH format remains the same this month. The listing uses th» following format: bird name, early late dates, reports/total and summary by county or detailed listing. The format of the county summary is as follows: county designation - number of reports/number of birds. The detailed listing format is as follows: county-(number of birds) day, observer code. Very rare birds are underlined. Birds with no previous record on date or vagrant status