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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 8, December 1975
Image 2
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 8, December 1975 - Image 2. December 1975. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 1, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1351/show/1344.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1975). The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 8, December 1975 - Image 2. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1351/show/1344

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 8, December 1975 - Image 2, December 1975, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 1, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1351/show/1344.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 25, No. 8, December 1975
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXV, No. 8, December 1975
Contributor (Local)
  • Jones, Margaret
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date December 1975
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 10, Folder 22
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9860
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b010_f022_012_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2 There is a $75 registration fee (payable on application), participants are responsible for their own food and lodging (motel or camping), though the CDRI staff will assist in making arrangments. A minimum of 12 persons and maximum of 20 is planned. If you are interested, plans should be made now, for May is a popular time In the Big Bend, and this is a great opportunity to learn from Roland Wauer, who is the author of "Birds of the Big Bend National Park and Vicinity", and Grainger Hunt, PhD, Chief Scientist of the CDRI, and principal Investigator of ongoing research on birds of prey in the Chlhuahuan Desert. Harry Brister has brochures and further information, or write CDRI, Box 1334, Alpine Texas 79830. PAST EVENTS Wes Cureton reports on the November OG field trip: 20 members and 5 guests were conducted around the Attwater Prairie Chicken NWR by assistant manager, John Kirk. The first stop was a field where the prairie chickens are known to gather. We were surprised to learn that the males do some booming In the fall, but not for courtship. We heard no booming, but did see three of the birds. Also at this spot were two Cara- caras, Marsh Hawk, Bobwhite, Savannah and Grasshopper sparrows. Sandhill cranes and various ducks and geese passed overhead. We then travelled to the wooded area and recorded yellow-bellied sapsucker, fox and white-throated sparrows, cedar waxwings, and barred owl. Here manager Lee Herzberger, who had been hunting near the refuge, joined us, and we were able to examine closely his mottled duck and male and female green-winged teal. Our Identification skills were especially tested by a hawk, that, Instead of being the immature bald eagle some thought it, turned out to be an extremely dark (Melan- istlc?) high-flying redtalI hawk. Almost passed off as another redtail was a white- tail hawk. (After leaving the refuge, however, one group got a getter look at two of these beautiful raptors). John Kirk says a pair may nest In the vicinity. The refuge headquarters was our lunch stop. We thank John Kirk and Lee Herzberger for their kind cooperation. AROUND AND ABOUT ** Nancy Moore, editor of THE CARDINAL, one of our exchange newsletters, has used ham radio operators to send out the word that a Northern Shrike is once again In the Wichita Falls area. You can call Nancy for directions at AC 817—692-2897. ** The use of a tape recorder to calI up birds Is very tempting, but perhaps our use of It Is lessening our birding expertise, and increasing-" possible harm to the birds In BIRDING (reprinted In The Prairie Horned Lark), Mrs. Dickie Bogle, Portal, Arizona, cautions: "May I respectfully request that you think twice before using a tape recording of the song of the birds you desperately want to add to your life list? My reasons follow: 1. The natural reaction of the male songster Is that another male Is threatening his territory—at least for territorial males. This must be disturbing to his breeding habits and perhaps even to the success of. his mating. Constant recordings, often all through the day by different groups must do harm to the bird's natural patterns. One birder gave the excuse that birds like competition! Avian, yes, Homo Sapiens, no. 2. Good birders usually have good ears and .good eyes. Let's use them. Listen for the voice, sit quietly and wait for it; or walk in the right habitat and listen. Once the voice Is located, It is seldom a problem to locate the bird you want. Admittedly, a tape recording saves time and almost insures seeing the bird. Birders will argue that they use the tape for only a few minutes at most. Multiply this few minutes by dozens of birders and what Is the result? Several experiences have alerted me to the Increasing use of tapes to locate wanted birds, thus convincing me never to use my tapes except Indoors to Implant the singing In my sound bank. At MIo, Michigan, a friend and I had just had the satisfactory experience of tracking down the Kirtland's Warbler, observing and listening to it for a half hour or more. When we returned to our car, some distance away, drivers of Michigan cars offered generously to 'call out the Kirtland's' for us. It has become a custom of hospitality to visiting birders. At South Fork in southeast Arizona, the Coppery-tailed Trogon Is bombarded yearly with his call on tapes...all day, for several days. The other night, some excellent birders from Massachusetts announced they were going up to South Fork to 'call out' the Trogon. I shuddered and suggested that they stop and listen first. We birders who presumably respect the lives of birds may help preserve some species by listening Instead of playing tapes." (Within the confines of the Klrtland Warbler Management Area neither camera nor recorders are allowed. —Ed.)