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The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 3, March 1993
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 3, March 1993 - Image 4. March 1993. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 2, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1294/show/1289.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1993). The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 3, March 1993 - Image 4. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1294/show/1289

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 3, March 1993 - Image 4, March 1993, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 2, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1294/show/1289.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 42, No. 3, March 1993
Contributor (Local)
  • Mueller Boyce, Judith
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date March 1993
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 12, Folder 13
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9878
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction In Copyright
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b012_f013_003_004.jpg
Transcript ARTICLES WEST HARRIS COUNTY - FEBRUARY 24 OG WEEKDAY FIELD TRIP REPORT by Gail Diane Luckner Nineteen birders gathered at Bear Creek Park to begin a "caravan-style" field trip through west Harrk County in search of sparrows, raptors and waterfowl. Although the cloudy, cool, very windy day yielded very few raptors, ten species of sparrows were found, including excellent looks at several Harrk' Sparrow in various plumages, a lifer for two members of the group. Side-by-side Field and Chipping Sparrow allowed Winnie and I to point out the key field marks of these two species which some birders find confusing. Ako obliging us were many White-crowned Sparrow in both adult and immature plumage, and several in the group learned how to distinguish these. We found nine species of waterfowl, including Snow, Canada and White-fronted Goose. Despite close looks at hundreds of Snows, we were unable to spot a Ross' among them. We did flush large numbers of Common Snipe from nearly every field where we stopped. A lovely Black- shouldered Kite turned out to be the raptor highlight of the day. The trip ended a little after 11:00 a.m. By then, the wind was blowing so hard it was difficult to hold our scopes and binoculars steady. We ended with 55 species for the day. Weekday field trip regular Al Clarke once again made the drive from Lake Jackson to join the outing. RABBITS BEWARE! Some Birds of Prey Hunt in Packs by William K Stevens [Reprinted from The New York Times, January 19,1993.] The majestic image of the lone eagle may often hold true. But scientists are ako beginning to piece together a more complex picture of eagles, hawks and falcons as team players whose hunting tactics and cunning intelligence invite comparison with the wolf and the fox. Eagles, in fact, not only mount concerted and successful attacks on the fox itself; they ako deceive monkeys, humans' close relatives, in a deadly game of predator versus prey. By acting together, they are even able to bring down big animak like deer, antelopes and African bushbucks. Diving, swooping and executing barrel rolls, peregrine falcons double-team rapidly darting swifts, birds that no single falcon could possibly outmaneuver. As the swift veers right and left in a horizontal plane, both male and female come at it from above. The male, smaller and more agile, reverses course once it k below the swift and attacks a second time, from beneath. The multiple assaults drive swifts to such dktraction that they fly into obstructions or plunge into water, becoming easy pickings. And in the Southwest, family groups of Harris's hawks assemble each winter morning, divide into platoons and scour the countryside for rabbits. When one k found, the platoons converge and go on the attack. If necessary, one platoon flushes the prey from brush directly into the talons of the other. If a speedy jack rabbit leads them on a chase, the hawks pursue in relays that keep the quarry running till it drops. These hawks are "not one whit behind a wolf pack" in their hunting behavior, said Dr. David H. EUk, an animal behaviorkt and raptor expert at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center of the U.S. Fkh and Wildlife Service at Laurel, Md. As the grimly fascinating evidence accumulates it k forcing scientists to reassess their longstanding treatment of raptors as solitary predators. Often the birds do hunt alone, and the difficulty of observing them at work has made it hard to dkcover other kinds of hunting behavior. But now, according to a study in the current issue of the journal BioScience, there are enough observations to suggest that eagles and their cousins command a wide repertory of predatory actions, including the most sophisticated. Thk command may be essential to the species' long-term evolutionary survival strategy. Raptors' newly appreciated prowess reveals "a high degree of intelligence," said Dr. Ellis, the primary author of the paper in BioScience.. Just how bright raptors are relative to the intelligent mammak they kill is unclear and a subject of future research. But in any case, the catalogue of behavior culled by Dr. Ellk and hk colleagues from the scientific literature adds up to a chilling picture of raptor craftiness. Some hunting hawks travel with similar birds, like vultures, to dkguke their presence from the prey. A number of raptors follow the leading edges of fires, rising flood waters, moving trains and even people to capture prey flushed by the disturbances. Peregrine falcons have accompanied a moving train for up to six miles for thk purpose. Gyrfalcons in Alaska often followed a trapper to catch ptarmigans, birds that he flushed while tending hk traps. In an extreme example, a northern harrier prowled an active bombing range to nab animak and birds scattered by