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The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 11, November 1984
Image 7
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The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 11, November 1984 - Image 7. November 1984. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1285/show/1283.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1984). The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 11, November 1984 - Image 7. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1285/show/1283

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 11, November 1984 - Image 7, November 1984, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1285/show/1283.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Spoonbill, Vol. 33, No. 11, November 1984
Alternative Title The Spoonbill, Vol. XXXIII, No. 11, November 1984
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Robison, B. C.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date November 1984
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 11, Folder 18
ArchivesSpace URI /repositories/2/archival_objects/9869
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction Rights Undetermined
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b011_f018_011_007.jpg
Transcript curvature vs. earlier immature ruby-throated. —— -Ron Braun (see Jofansgard "The Hummingbirds of North America" pages 176-191 for a more complete discussion of separating ruby-throated fc black-chinned hummingbirds. - ed.) BUFF-BELLIED HUMMINGBIRD: Large hummer with green back, head, and throat. Belly was buffy, not gray. Tail rufous. Red bill with dark tip. Been repeatedly at feeder at window at distance of 3-6 ft. "Chip" note quite distinct from that of rubythroats at feeder. Doyle t Diane Wise PURPLE MARTIN: Large hirundinidae; dark with white bellies; squarish tail. Immatures. Elaine Robinson Adams WORM-EATING WARBLER: the worm-eating warbler was ochre chested, black and ochre head stripes, foraging low. Looked just like the one in the book. Bob Behrstock (AUDUBON'S WARBLER): two winter-plumaged individuals foraging in canopy of oaks in park. On each I observed the following: large size for a warbler; brown upperparts including sides of head; distinct light eye-ring with no hint of a superciliary stripe; two buffy-white wingbars; distinct patch of light yellow stood out on chin and throat; less distinct, small yellowish patch on sides at bend of wing; remainder of underparts whitish with indistinct streaking at chest and along sides; underside of tail black with large white spots; both birds frequently uttered characteristic "chep" note. Observed repeatedly this day and on 06 October from as close as 4-5 meters; 10x50 binoculars; adequate light. First record for first week in October. ——Randy Pinkston Hooded Warbler: young male with almost complete hood. Tail constantly fanned slightly to show white. — Wesley Cureton Boat-tailed Grackle (Yellow-eyed form): Large grackle, basically all black, with blue and purple iridescent colors in some light conditions. Large, keel-shaped tail. Bright yellow eye distinctly and clearly visible. Bird was calling while perched on a small post in Shoveler's Pond at Anahuac NWR. Both observers heard the bird and studied it in excellent light for about 5 minutes with 10X binocs. The bird was photographed with a 400mm lens and the photos show the bright yellow eye. The bird was seen at distances of 10-30 m. Both observers are very familiar with the Great- tailed and Common Grackles as well as the dark- eyed form of Boat-tailed Grackle. The distinct squeaky "rusty gate" call eliminates all other grackles from consideration. Jim Morgan fc Randy Pinkston Scarlet Tanager: Winter male. Bird was very close and obviously a tanager by size, beak, etc Plumage was yellow-green, back very green. The wings and tail were black. -Jane t John Hamilton SCARLET TANAGER: Very greenish tanager. Uniform in color, except that wings were only slightly darker. Apparently first record for last week in .October. Wesley Cureton Clay-colored Sparrow: Appearance: Light colored, brownish sparrow 12-13 em in length; crown dark, brown in color with thin black streaking, divided medially the entire length of the head by a very distinct whitish-buff stripe; superciliary stripe, pale buff in color, and malar stripe, less buff and more white than superciliary, forming a wide frame around a very distinct brown cheek-patch bordered above and below with black; black submalar streak very distinct; lores pale brownish; side of neck a rich gray forming a distinct collar, contrasting with whitish underparts; back light brownish, boldly streaked with black; brown of scapulars and wing coverts also light, with slight hint of rufous; rump not seen; tail light gray-brown, moderately long and deeply notched; bill pinkish-brown, dark at edges and tip; legs pale fleshy-pink; irides dark. Voice: Occasionally gave a weak "chip * note. Habitat: Weedy field bordered by tall hedgerow. Behavior: Fairly timid, seeking refuge in hedgerow; the bird was otherwise feeding by perching low on ragweed stubble or other plants and picking seeds 4 from crabgrass tassels within its reach. Observation: Observed on four occasions, once for at least 2 minutes, over a 30-45 minute period at midday from 12-15 meters; 10x50 and 10x40 binoculars; excellent light. Similar species: Immature or fall adult Chipping Sparrow can be ruled out for several reasons including our bird's gray collar contrasting with whitish underparts, distinct submalar streak, highly contrasting facial pattern (in particular the black line bordering bottom of cheek-patch), pale lores, and its overall pale appearance; Brewer's Sparrow can also be ruled out by our bird's contrasting collar and sides, contrasting facial pattern, and its distinct medial crown- stripe. ——Randyn Pinkston & Jim Morgan Information on Zone-Tailed Hawks Requested As you may be aware, there have been increasing numbers of reports of wintering Zone-tailed Hawks in the central and southern portions of Texas in recent years. I am interested in gathering as much data as possible concerning these reports including date, location, observers and complete written details. I am specifically interested in winter (Nov.-Feb. inclusive) records from anywhere in the state and any records of the species east of the Balcones Escarpment. If you have any information concerning these sightings or know someone who does, I would certainly appreciate hearing from you. Those of you who are area coordinators or persons to whom other observers send their records to may have some of the desired information tucked away in files. If possible, would you search your files for Zone-tailed records? Eventually I hope to put together a paper on these sightings and all contributors will be acknowledged. Please send your reports to Greg Lasley, 5103 Turnabout Lane, Austin, TX 78731 or call (512)454-7453. Southern Florida For Houston Birders May 5-12, 1985 Next in Peregrine's series of low-cost, custom-designed itineraries for Houston birdwatchers will be a trip to Southern Florida; This area hosts numerous species of birds, plants and other life forms with very limited distributions in the U.S. These include LIMPKIN, BROWN NODDY, GRAY KINGBIRD, SNAIL (EVERGLADES) KITE, SMOOTH-BILLED ANI, and ANTILLEAN NIGHTHAWK. The tour will include an overnight on the Dry Tortugas, home of tens of thousands of nesting terns, a pelagic trip into the Gulf Stream, the Keys, the Everglades, and the Miami area. The tour was designed and will be led by Ben Feltner and Bob Behrstock, both of whom have covered the areas to be visited. As always, OG members will be given first preference for signing up. This tour presents numerous opportunities for photographing birds, plants, and mammals. For an itinerary, call Peregrine at 441-1220. Itineraries will also be available at OG meetings.